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“Let’s Stay Together: Racial Separation among African American High School Students Attending Predominately White Schools.”

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Abstract:

In this study, I explore what I call “coping strategies” --assimilation, integration, separation and marginalization-- used by minority students who are in predominately White schools. Rather than being understood individually, I show in this study that these strategies are better understood as a social matrix. Depending upon the context, the majority of the minority student population will use more than one of these strategies at any given time. Further, we might gain a better understanding of micro-level race interactions if we can begin to map context. Are there times when minorities are more likely to engage in “separation” than other times? Why? Is there one strategy that seems to be more appealing overall, or are all tools equally useful?
If we can discover the answers to these questions things; a) we can begin to map the contextual nature of collective racial identity, b) we can unlock how students successfully negotiate race, collective identity, and school success, c) we can chart a course that will allow us to better understand how we can create inclusive environments that allow students to be academically (or professionally) successful and stay culturally rooted.

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black (160), white (95), like (85), student (80), school (66), cultur (56), act (44), social (37), racial (32), one (30), race (30), peopl (29), think (28), know (28), re (27), michell (25), separ (23), 1999 (23), ident (23), studi (22), assimil (21),
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307532_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Burstion-Young, Michelle. "“Let’s Stay Together: Racial Separation among African American High School Students Attending Predominately White Schools.”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307532_index.html>

APA Citation:

Burstion-Young, M. R. , 2009-08-08 "“Let’s Stay Together: Racial Separation among African American High School Students Attending Predominately White Schools.”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307532_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, I explore what I call “coping strategies” --assimilation, integration, separation and marginalization-- used by minority students who are in predominately White schools. Rather than being understood individually, I show in this study that these strategies are better understood as a social matrix. Depending upon the context, the majority of the minority student population will use more than one of these strategies at any given time. Further, we might gain a better understanding of micro-level race interactions if we can begin to map context. Are there times when minorities are more likely to engage in “separation” than other times? Why? Is there one strategy that seems to be more appealing overall, or are all tools equally useful?
If we can discover the answers to these questions things; a) we can begin to map the contextual nature of collective racial identity, b) we can unlock how students successfully negotiate race, collective identity, and school success, c) we can chart a course that will allow us to better understand how we can create inclusive environments that allow students to be academically (or professionally) successful and stay culturally rooted.


Similar Titles:
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“The first step in knowing who you are racially is being able to talk about it”: A case study of three White principals in predominantly African American schools.

Social Comparisons, Social Networks, and Racial Identity: The Case of Black-White Biracial Americans


 
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