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19. Exploring the Effect of Different Learning Styles in Specifying Social Learning Theories of Criminal Behavior.

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Social learning theory has enjoyed a long history of empirical support in predicting deviance. Over the course of many decades the theory has be refined and expanded to include macro and micro aspects, to explore gender, race and ethnic differences in offending and to model treatment programs on. Still, the core components focusing on the learning process rest on an assumption that people all learn in basically the same way. That is, people may vary in their exposure to types of differential associations, definitions and other discriminative stimuli, differential reinforcements, and imitation, but the underlying assumption is that persons incorporate these processes in the same way.
This poster presentation will report on an attempt to expand social learning theory by modeling different learning styles (Kolb, 1985) to predict criminal behavior and drug use. The main question we examine is whether how people learn is important regarding criminal behavior. Utilizing data from a study of 725 incarcerated offenders returning to the community collected from 2006-2007, we present a series of analyses demonstrating that styles of learning are an important and unspecified element in criminological learning theory. Results indicate that offenders are substantially different from general population samples in learning styles, that race and gender differences are significant within the offender samples and that different styles of learning correlate with different offending patterns. We suggest that Social Learning theories of deviance would benefit conceptually and empirically from the inclusion of different styles of learning.

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parent (33), gambl (31), messag (30), learn (28), effect (25), model (23), full (15), reduc (15), household (14), two (14), youth (13), monitor (13), activ (12), climat (12), signific (11), differ (11), famili (10), theori (9), present (9), offend (9), style (9),
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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MLA Citation:

Oconnell, Daniel. and Martin, Steven. "19. Exploring the Effect of Different Learning Styles in Specifying Social Learning Theories of Criminal Behavior." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309120_index.html>

APA Citation:

Oconnell, D. and Martin, S. S. , 2009-08-08 "19. Exploring the Effect of Different Learning Styles in Specifying Social Learning Theories of Criminal Behavior." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309120_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social learning theory has enjoyed a long history of empirical support in predicting deviance. Over the course of many decades the theory has be refined and expanded to include macro and micro aspects, to explore gender, race and ethnic differences in offending and to model treatment programs on. Still, the core components focusing on the learning process rest on an assumption that people all learn in basically the same way. That is, people may vary in their exposure to types of differential associations, definitions and other discriminative stimuli, differential reinforcements, and imitation, but the underlying assumption is that persons incorporate these processes in the same way.
This poster presentation will report on an attempt to expand social learning theory by modeling different learning styles (Kolb, 1985) to predict criminal behavior and drug use. The main question we examine is whether how people learn is important regarding criminal behavior. Utilizing data from a study of 725 incarcerated offenders returning to the community collected from 2006-2007, we present a series of analyses demonstrating that styles of learning are an important and unspecified element in criminological learning theory. Results indicate that offenders are substantially different from general population samples in learning styles, that race and gender differences are significant within the offender samples and that different styles of learning correlate with different offending patterns. We suggest that Social Learning theories of deviance would benefit conceptually and empirically from the inclusion of different styles of learning.


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