Citation

System Change versus Stability: A Cross-System Comparison of System Justification Tendencies at Work

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Abstract:

According to system justification theory, people seek to maintain the legitimacy and stability of existing forms of social arrangements. We are interested in whether different types of social systems, each characterized by a unique historical backdrop and development, are justified to a different extent or in different ways. The present study investigated views held by American (n = 108) and Hungarian (n = 114) participants concerning what is fair in the workplace and what is not. Participants rated the fairness of, their satisfaction with, and the typicality of 4 hypothetical work situations, which differed in terms of distributive justice principles. Participants’ motivation to justify the system was also recorded.
Our findings indicate a general tendency to view the equity-based work situations more positively. Further, in both American and Hungarian contexts, the motivation to justify the system was associated with participants perceiving a range of workplace situations as fairer and feeling more satisfied with them. Based on the characteristics of one’s specific social system, however, these tendencies played out somewhat differently. Specifically, for Hungarians system justification was only associated with more positive views of work situations based on equality principles, whereas for Americans it was associated with more positive views of work situations based on equity principles. This research not only promotes a better understanding of the situational antecedents of people’s responses to justice-related events, but it also provides further evidence for the significance of system justification motivation for responses to equity and equality in people’s daily lives.

Author's Keywords:

System justification; distributive justice; fairness; cross-cultural; workplace; system change; equity vs. equality.
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Association:
Name: ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314709_index.html
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MLA Citation:

van der Toorn, Jojanneke., Berkics, Mihaly. and Jost, John. "System Change versus Stability: A Cross-System Comparison of System Justification Tendencies at Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314709_index.html>

APA Citation:

van der Toorn, J. , Berkics, M. and Jost, J. , 2009-07-14 "System Change versus Stability: A Cross-System Comparison of System Justification Tendencies at Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314709_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to system justification theory, people seek to maintain the legitimacy and stability of existing forms of social arrangements. We are interested in whether different types of social systems, each characterized by a unique historical backdrop and development, are justified to a different extent or in different ways. The present study investigated views held by American (n = 108) and Hungarian (n = 114) participants concerning what is fair in the workplace and what is not. Participants rated the fairness of, their satisfaction with, and the typicality of 4 hypothetical work situations, which differed in terms of distributive justice principles. Participants’ motivation to justify the system was also recorded.
Our findings indicate a general tendency to view the equity-based work situations more positively. Further, in both American and Hungarian contexts, the motivation to justify the system was associated with participants perceiving a range of workplace situations as fairer and feeling more satisfied with them. Based on the characteristics of one’s specific social system, however, these tendencies played out somewhat differently. Specifically, for Hungarians system justification was only associated with more positive views of work situations based on equality principles, whereas for Americans it was associated with more positive views of work situations based on equity principles. This research not only promotes a better understanding of the situational antecedents of people’s responses to justice-related events, but it also provides further evidence for the significance of system justification motivation for responses to equity and equality in people’s daily lives.


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