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Abraham Lincoln & John L. O'Sullivan: Two Visions of American Civil Religion Before the Civil War

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Abstract:

Attempting to place early Lincoln within a rhetorical context, I contrast the civil religious framework described in his public speech with that of John L. O'Sullivan, editor of the United States Magazine and Democratic Review and the man who gave Manifest Destiny its name. Lincoln's civil religious thought revolves around the central concept of human equality, rooted in a shared insufficiency in the face of God, while O'Sullivan emphasizes the political ideal of liberty and sees the United States as a sinless agent of the divine will. The two men thus use civil religious language to advocate opposing positions on issues including Manifest Destiny, the expansion of slavery, the origins of political rights, and fundamentally the role of the United States in world history.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (122), lincoln (109), polit (90), o (88), sullivan (86), democrat (67), equal (59), p (57), state (54), civil (49), america (46), slaveri (40), god (38), moral (38), histori (37), religi (36), unit (36), new (36), human (35), nation (34), faith (32),

Author's Keywords:

civil religion, america, united states, lincoln, abraham lincoln, John L O'Sullivan, Young America, manifest destiny, religion, civil war, liberty, equality, american civil religion
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Association:
Name: WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions"
URL:
http://www.csus.edu/ORG/WPSA/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p317191_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Gomez, Adam. "Abraham Lincoln & John L. O'Sullivan: Two Visions of American Civil Religion Before the Civil War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions", Hyatt Regency Vancouver, BC Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p317191_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gomez, A. , 2009-03-19 "Abraham Lincoln & John L. O'Sullivan: Two Visions of American Civil Religion Before the Civil War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions", Hyatt Regency Vancouver, BC Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p317191_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Attempting to place early Lincoln within a rhetorical context, I contrast the civil religious framework described in his public speech with that of John L. O'Sullivan, editor of the United States Magazine and Democratic Review and the man who gave Manifest Destiny its name. Lincoln's civil religious thought revolves around the central concept of human equality, rooted in a shared insufficiency in the face of God, while O'Sullivan emphasizes the political ideal of liberty and sees the United States as a sinless agent of the divine will. The two men thus use civil religious language to advocate opposing positions on issues including Manifest Destiny, the expansion of slavery, the origins of political rights, and fundamentally the role of the United States in world history.


Similar Titles:
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The Creed of Our Political Faith: Thomas Jefferson’ s United States Civil Religion

Turning the Tide: A Whaling Moratorium Proposal at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment and the Bureaucratic Politics of Japan, the United State, and the United Kingdom


 
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