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Translation Against Translation in Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies

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Abstract:

This paper proposes an interrogation of translation in Chicano/a and Latino/a literary and cultural studies. While translation is frequently interpreted as a mediator between different languages and identities, within Chicano/a and Latino/a cultural texts, it explicitly resists and transforms the limits of the written or spoken utterance. Rather than merely decoding difference literally, translation becomes the means by which the marginalized languages in the United States such as informal and formal Spanish, caló, and Spanglish are reproduced through performative tactics, such as gestures, silences, pitch and, the (re)construction of memory through visual imagery. Ultimately, Chicano/a and Latino/a cultural texts reject the notion of translation as mere substitution between “original” and “new” texts in order to perform translation as economic and social exchange.
Furthermore, though much has been written about the potential conflicts between Chicano/a and Latino/a studies – usually based upon regional, class, or racial distinctions in terms of Latino populations, or upon their position between and against area studies, ethnic studies, cultural studies, and English and Spanish departments within the U.S. academy – I argue that translation serves as a bridge between Chicano/a and Latino/a studies that challenges and transcends typical divisions based on identity politics. In this manner, following the ASA’s focus for 2009 on practices of citizenship, sustainability, and belonging, I contend that practices of translation help structure alternative modes of Latino/a communities that are acutely aware of the exclusionary power of national and nationalist Latino/a identities. To this end, I briefly examine a variety of texts ranging from Chicana author Norma Elia Cantú’s “fictional autobioethnography” Canícula to Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz’s novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao to Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s film Babel.
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Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
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Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318592_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Martín, Desirée. "Translation Against Translation in Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Renaissance Hotel, Washington D.C., <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318592_index.html>

APA Citation:

Martín, D. "Translation Against Translation in Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Renaissance Hotel, Washington D.C. <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318592_index.html

Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: This paper proposes an interrogation of translation in Chicano/a and Latino/a literary and cultural studies. While translation is frequently interpreted as a mediator between different languages and identities, within Chicano/a and Latino/a cultural texts, it explicitly resists and transforms the limits of the written or spoken utterance. Rather than merely decoding difference literally, translation becomes the means by which the marginalized languages in the United States such as informal and formal Spanish, caló, and Spanglish are reproduced through performative tactics, such as gestures, silences, pitch and, the (re)construction of memory through visual imagery. Ultimately, Chicano/a and Latino/a cultural texts reject the notion of translation as mere substitution between “original” and “new” texts in order to perform translation as economic and social exchange.
Furthermore, though much has been written about the potential conflicts between Chicano/a and Latino/a studies – usually based upon regional, class, or racial distinctions in terms of Latino populations, or upon their position between and against area studies, ethnic studies, cultural studies, and English and Spanish departments within the U.S. academy – I argue that translation serves as a bridge between Chicano/a and Latino/a studies that challenges and transcends typical divisions based on identity politics. In this manner, following the ASA’s focus for 2009 on practices of citizenship, sustainability, and belonging, I contend that practices of translation help structure alternative modes of Latino/a communities that are acutely aware of the exclusionary power of national and nationalist Latino/a identities. To this end, I briefly examine a variety of texts ranging from Chicana author Norma Elia Cantú’s “fictional autobioethnography” Canícula to Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz’s novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao to Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s film Babel.


Similar Titles:
Cultural Translation in International Studies: Examples from an Ethnographic Study on Japanese Special Education

The Global Implications of Two Chicana/o Regionalisms: A Case Study in Comparative American Studies.

Translating Verbs from Arabic into English: Implications of Contrastive Linguistic Studies to Improving Translators' Skills


 
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