Citation

The Life Cycle Theory of Political Participation and the 2008 Election: The Impact of Marriage, Parenthood, and Home Ownership on College and Non-College Youth

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The conventional view of participation is that turnout is lowest at the beginning of adult life, rises to a plateau in middle life, and declines as maturity fades into old age (Lipset 1960). This is known as the life cycle theory of political participation, and has been used to explain why older people participate in politics at greater rates than young people. According to this theory, young people do not participate in the electoral process because they have not “settled down” in their communities. Older people are more likely to be married, have children, own their own homes, and be less residentially mobile. _x000d__x000d_Using a dataset that captures both college and non-college youth, I investigate whether the life cycle theory of political participation explains multiple forms of political activity, including voting in the 2008 presidential election, volunteering on a political campaign, making a donation, and contributing to a political blog. The data used is from Harvard University’s Institute of Politics (IOP) and includes questions regarding college and non-college youth’s living arrangements, family responsibilities, and marital status.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference
URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360636_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Evans, Heather. "The Life Cycle Theory of Political Participation and the 2008 Election: The Impact of Marriage, Parenthood, and Home Ownership on College and Non-College Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360636_index.html>

APA Citation:

Evans, H. K. "The Life Cycle Theory of Political Participation and the 2008 Election: The Impact of Marriage, Parenthood, and Home Ownership on College and Non-College Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360636_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The conventional view of participation is that turnout is lowest at the beginning of adult life, rises to a plateau in middle life, and declines as maturity fades into old age (Lipset 1960). This is known as the life cycle theory of political participation, and has been used to explain why older people participate in politics at greater rates than young people. According to this theory, young people do not participate in the electoral process because they have not “settled down” in their communities. Older people are more likely to be married, have children, own their own homes, and be less residentially mobile. _x000d__x000d_Using a dataset that captures both college and non-college youth, I investigate whether the life cycle theory of political participation explains multiple forms of political activity, including voting in the 2008 presidential election, volunteering on a political campaign, making a donation, and contributing to a political blog. The data used is from Harvard University’s Institute of Politics (IOP) and includes questions regarding college and non-college youth’s living arrangements, family responsibilities, and marital status.


Similar Titles:
Youth Political Participation: Home Politics vs. Neighborhood Politics

Exploring the Role of Internet Use and Web-based Campaign Participation in Online Political Expression During the 2008 Election Cycle


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.