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The Speaker is Recognized: Floor Behavior of House Speakers, 1983-2007

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Abstract:

The Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives has multiple roles. This study addresses an aspect of the speakership that has not been previously analyzed. In this paper we examine the floor behavior, through speaking and voting, of the past six Speakers of the U.S. House. _x000d_The congressional literature is been replete with debates over competing models of party influence in the House. Smith argues that single goal models are insufficient to explain party leadership. Sinclair emphasizes party polarization as a critical factor in explaining behavior in the post-reform Congress. Cox and McCubbins have advanced the cartel theory of control by party leaders. Electoral influences are dominant in Rohde’s analysis._x000d_In this paper, we will explore whether the floor appearances of Speakers lend support for any of the competing theories of party leadership in the House. The 1983-2008 time period and number of different Speakers (14 years for each party) provide a rich data set with variation to test these hypotheses. These are first data of actual floor appearances that have been analyzed. They are available from data collected from C-SPAN video recordings of the House of Representatives.

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speaker (186), floor (80), polici (63), parti (54), hous (42), role (36), bill (35), debat (34), member (32), pelosi (31), vote (31), gingrich (29), speech (28), time (28), speak (26), rayburn (25), year (25), neill (24), o (24), use (23), wright (22),
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Association:
Name: Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference
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http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361281_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Browning, Robert. "The Speaker is Recognized: Floor Behavior of House Speakers, 1983-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361281_index.html>

APA Citation:

Browning, R. X. , 2009-04-02 "The Speaker is Recognized: Floor Behavior of House Speakers, 1983-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361281_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives has multiple roles. This study addresses an aspect of the speakership that has not been previously analyzed. In this paper we examine the floor behavior, through speaking and voting, of the past six Speakers of the U.S. House. _x000d_The congressional literature is been replete with debates over competing models of party influence in the House. Smith argues that single goal models are insufficient to explain party leadership. Sinclair emphasizes party polarization as a critical factor in explaining behavior in the post-reform Congress. Cox and McCubbins have advanced the cartel theory of control by party leaders. Electoral influences are dominant in Rohde’s analysis._x000d_In this paper, we will explore whether the floor appearances of Speakers lend support for any of the competing theories of party leadership in the House. The 1983-2008 time period and number of different Speakers (14 years for each party) provide a rich data set with variation to test these hypotheses. These are first data of actual floor appearances that have been analyzed. They are available from data collected from C-SPAN video recordings of the House of Representatives.


Similar Titles:
Ideological Stability and Deliberative Volatility: Evidence from Floor Votes and Policy Debates During the 100th, 104th and 105th Congresses

From Rules to Norms: The Role of Rule Changes, Speaker's Precedents, and Party Practice in Institutional Development in the House


 
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