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The 2008 Debates in the United States and Canada: How U.S. and Canadian Viewers, Listeners and Readers Pick Their Winners

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A transnational team of researchers surveyed students at a Canadian and a U.S. university as they watched the presidential or prime ministerial debates or listened without video. Inspired by the legend that Nixon bested Kennedy in the 1960 debates among radio listeners but not television viewers, the current study builds on a study of the 2004 debates. It now includes Canadians surveyed as they watched or listened to the English-language debate among the five candidates to be Canada's prime minister and Canadians surveyed as they watched the second presidential debate -- along with U.S. students surveyed while watching or listening to the first two presidential debates and the vice presidential debate. A second expansion of the study is that Canadian and U.S. students who failed to watch or listen to a debate live were given parallel surveys to see how their impressions of the debates gained from the mass media and interpersonal discussions compared with those in the live debate watching or listening experiment. In all cases, the surveys were designed to develop and test a scale on how "presidential" (or "prime ministerial") the candidates were, because that was the most robust variable in the 2004 debates study.

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debat (255), presidenti (136), 2008 (82), media (57), candid (53), rate (52), studi (41), watch (35), survey (34), u.s (33), said (32), signific (32), campaign (32), televis (31), particip (31), effect (28), presid (28), first (28), elect (27), differ (26), p (25),
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Name: Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference
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http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


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MLA Citation:

Dorsher, Michael., Kapfer, Jack., Larson, Jan., Crowley, David. and Waller, Harold. "The 2008 Debates in the United States and Canada: How U.S. and Canadian Viewers, Listeners and Readers Pick Their Winners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361794_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dorsher, M. , Kapfer, J. , Larson, J. , Crowley, D. and Waller, H. , 2009-04-02 "The 2008 Debates in the United States and Canada: How U.S. and Canadian Viewers, Listeners and Readers Pick Their Winners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361794_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A transnational team of researchers surveyed students at a Canadian and a U.S. university as they watched the presidential or prime ministerial debates or listened without video. Inspired by the legend that Nixon bested Kennedy in the 1960 debates among radio listeners but not television viewers, the current study builds on a study of the 2004 debates. It now includes Canadians surveyed as they watched or listened to the English-language debate among the five candidates to be Canada's prime minister and Canadians surveyed as they watched the second presidential debate -- along with U.S. students surveyed while watching or listening to the first two presidential debates and the vice presidential debate. A second expansion of the study is that Canadian and U.S. students who failed to watch or listen to a debate live were given parallel surveys to see how their impressions of the debates gained from the mass media and interpersonal discussions compared with those in the live debate watching or listening experiment. In all cases, the surveys were designed to develop and test a scale on how "presidential" (or "prime ministerial") the candidates were, because that was the most robust variable in the 2004 debates study.


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Examining the Third-person Effect and the Hostile Media Effect of Media Polls in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election


 
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