Citation

Humor for a Tyrant: Dreams and Desires in A Midsummer Night's Dream

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream appears to be Shakespeare’s most playful and joyful work. As we follow the lovers and rude mechanicals through their adventures, we enter as well the world of the fairies and join in their antics. As soon as we begin to dwell comfortably in the fairy-like world of the play, we are reminded of the harsh presentation of love in the opening scene and the rational, chiastic structure underlying the action. We are confronted with a seemingly incompatible tension within human desire: our desire for the useful and immediately gratifying and the permanent, noble, and good for its own sake. Amid the antics of the lovers in the woods, the play presents the harsh consequences of unrestrained desire through the self proclaimed tyrannical soul: Bottom. Translated into the fairy world, Bottom, physically united with the god-like Titania, achieves what the lovers in the woods seek, but with monstrous effects. The resolution of the play depends upon Theseus’ ability to tame Bottom. This paper will examine how dreams and desires unite to moderate tyranny and to allow A Midsummer Night’s Dream to become, like the mechanical’s performance of Pyramus and Thisby, a most comical tragedy.
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference
URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363752_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Nee, Laurence. "Humor for a Tyrant: Dreams and Desires in A Midsummer Night's Dream" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363752_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nee, L. "Humor for a Tyrant: Dreams and Desires in A Midsummer Night's Dream" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363752_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A Midsummer Night’s Dream appears to be Shakespeare’s most playful and joyful work. As we follow the lovers and rude mechanicals through their adventures, we enter as well the world of the fairies and join in their antics. As soon as we begin to dwell comfortably in the fairy-like world of the play, we are reminded of the harsh presentation of love in the opening scene and the rational, chiastic structure underlying the action. We are confronted with a seemingly incompatible tension within human desire: our desire for the useful and immediately gratifying and the permanent, noble, and good for its own sake. Amid the antics of the lovers in the woods, the play presents the harsh consequences of unrestrained desire through the self proclaimed tyrannical soul: Bottom. Translated into the fairy world, Bottom, physically united with the god-like Titania, achieves what the lovers in the woods seek, but with monstrous effects. The resolution of the play depends upon Theseus’ ability to tame Bottom. This paper will examine how dreams and desires unite to moderate tyranny and to allow A Midsummer Night’s Dream to become, like the mechanical’s performance of Pyramus and Thisby, a most comical tragedy.


Similar Titles:
“How shall we find the concord of this discord?”—Poetry, Philosophy and the New Law in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Law and Equity in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Collecting Performance in Francis Meres and A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Coercion and Consent in A Midsummer Night's Dream


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.