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Characterization of WAT and BAT Adipogenesis from Unique Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sources

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Abstract:

Adipose tissue is a major endocrine organ that exerts a profound influence on whole-body homoeostasis. Two types of adipose tissue exist in mammals: WAT (white adipose tissue) and BAT (brown adipose tissue). WAT stores energy and is the largest energy reserve in mammals, whereas BAT, expressing UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1), can dissipate energy through adaptive thermogenesis. It is well appreciated that adipogenesis plays a critical role in energy metabolism and is a contributing factor to the obesity epidemic, as well as other metabolic diseases like diabetes. Despite the different functions of white and brown adipocytes, knowledge of factors differentially influencing the formation of white and brown fat cells is sparse. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of white versus brown adipocyte differentiation. We describe the characterization of two distinct adipogenic progenitor cells, one isolated from adipose tissue and the other isolated from the matrix of the umbilical cord, that preferentially differentiate into human WAT and BAT, respectively. While both of these adipogenic progenitor cells are derived from cells with characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells, each has unique qualities that may be important in our understanding of lineage commitment during the formation of WAT and BAT. Insights gained from studing these stem cell models systems may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to control obesity and other metabloic diseases, like diabetes, that are directly or indirectly attributable to disregulated control of energy metabolism.
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Association:
Name: Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium
URL:
http://stemconn.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369373_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Heckel, Robert., Gautreau, Denise., Lillquist, Jay., Chen, Jing., Raimundo, Nuno., Lebedeva, Maria., Shadel, Gerald. and Hambor, John. "Characterization of WAT and BAT Adipogenesis from Unique Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sources" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium, Omni Hotel, New Haven, CT, Mar 23, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369373_index.html>

APA Citation:

Heckel, R. , Gautreau, D. , Lillquist, J. , Chen, J. , Raimundo, N. , Lebedeva, M. , Shadel, G. and Hambor, J. , 2009-03-23 "Characterization of WAT and BAT Adipogenesis from Unique Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sources" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium, Omni Hotel, New Haven, CT <Not Available>. 2014-11-29 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369373_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Adipose tissue is a major endocrine organ that exerts a profound influence on whole-body homoeostasis. Two types of adipose tissue exist in mammals: WAT (white adipose tissue) and BAT (brown adipose tissue). WAT stores energy and is the largest energy reserve in mammals, whereas BAT, expressing UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1), can dissipate energy through adaptive thermogenesis. It is well appreciated that adipogenesis plays a critical role in energy metabolism and is a contributing factor to the obesity epidemic, as well as other metabolic diseases like diabetes. Despite the different functions of white and brown adipocytes, knowledge of factors differentially influencing the formation of white and brown fat cells is sparse. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of white versus brown adipocyte differentiation. We describe the characterization of two distinct adipogenic progenitor cells, one isolated from adipose tissue and the other isolated from the matrix of the umbilical cord, that preferentially differentiate into human WAT and BAT, respectively. While both of these adipogenic progenitor cells are derived from cells with characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells, each has unique qualities that may be important in our understanding of lineage commitment during the formation of WAT and BAT. Insights gained from studing these stem cell models systems may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to control obesity and other metabloic diseases, like diabetes, that are directly or indirectly attributable to disregulated control of energy metabolism.


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