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Measuring Victimhood: Developing a Victim Self-Ascription Scale

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Abstract:

Trauma theory suggests the criteria necessary to feel victimized are not that one has been a victim of some terrible event, but only that one believes that this is so (Janoff-Bulman, 1992; Herman, 1992). Yet psychologists have never actually attempted to measure differences in these beliefs. The result is that victimological literature attributes victim outcomes (typically depression, anxiety or PTSD) directly to victim experiences, and any variation in those outcomes either to differences among the events themselves or differences in victim coping ability. This overlooks another important possibility: that individuals vary in the extent to which they are, or believe themselves to be, victims to begin with. This study seeks to address this deficit by developing a scalar measure of 'victim self-ascription', or the perception that one is a victim. Such a measure will allow us to gain valuable insights into the process whereby victims come to learn and understand that they are victims.

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victim (214), event (77), attribut (52), individu (46), measur (46), harm (40), self (39), studi (38), experi (38), perceiv (37), victimhood (37), page (36), one (35), davi (33), percept (33), subject (31), extern (31), item (30), cite (30), feel (29), andi (29),
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370713_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Davies, Andrew. "Measuring Victimhood: Developing a Victim Self-Ascription Scale" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370713_index.html>

APA Citation:

Davies, A. L. , 2009-11-04 "Measuring Victimhood: Developing a Victim Self-Ascription Scale" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370713_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Trauma theory suggests the criteria necessary to feel victimized are not that one has been a victim of some terrible event, but only that one believes that this is so (Janoff-Bulman, 1992; Herman, 1992). Yet psychologists have never actually attempted to measure differences in these beliefs. The result is that victimological literature attributes victim outcomes (typically depression, anxiety or PTSD) directly to victim experiences, and any variation in those outcomes either to differences among the events themselves or differences in victim coping ability. This overlooks another important possibility: that individuals vary in the extent to which they are, or believe themselves to be, victims to begin with. This study seeks to address this deficit by developing a scalar measure of 'victim self-ascription', or the perception that one is a victim. Such a measure will allow us to gain valuable insights into the process whereby victims come to learn and understand that they are victims.


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Comparative Study of the American and Korean Female EldersÂ’ Perception of Subjective Age and Self-Concept and the Impact on Responses to Age Segmentation Cues (ASCs)

The Meaning and Measurement of Routine Activities Theory in Individual Level Studies of Crime and Victimization

The BIAS Treatment Scale (BIAS-TS): A measure of the subjective experience of active and passive harm and facilitation.


 
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