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More Alike than Different? Assortative Mating and Antisocial Behavior in Adulthood.

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Abstract:

An impressive line of research has demonstrated that individuals tend to select their mates based on a number of shared characteristics—a phenomenon known as assortative mating. For example, age, race, socio-economic status, level of education, and personality traits have all be shown to be highly similar between mates. Additional evidence is surfacing suggesting that a number of antisocial traits, such as psychopathology, impulsivity, and negative affectivity, are also strongly correlated between mates. Although there is some research examining assortative mating in other disciplines, there is a paucity of criminological research directly examining this issue. We address this gap in the literature by analyzing a national sample of mothers and fathers drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort data. Our results are in line with previous research showing similarity between mates on antisocial behaviors. The ways in which assortative mating can be integrated into mainstream criminological theories are discussed.

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mate (8), research (4), assort (4), antisoci (3), line (2), examin (2), similar (2), criminolog (2), behavior (2), trait (2), number (2), address (1), surfac (1), discuss (1), theori (1), boutwel (1), strong (1), nation (1), mother (1), integr (1), person (1),
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Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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MLA Citation:

Boutwell, Brian. and Beaver, Kevin. "More Alike than Different? Assortative Mating and Antisocial Behavior in Adulthood." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371821_index.html>

APA Citation:

Boutwell, B. B. and Beaver, K. M. , 2009-11-04 "More Alike than Different? Assortative Mating and Antisocial Behavior in Adulthood." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371821_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An impressive line of research has demonstrated that individuals tend to select their mates based on a number of shared characteristics—a phenomenon known as assortative mating. For example, age, race, socio-economic status, level of education, and personality traits have all be shown to be highly similar between mates. Additional evidence is surfacing suggesting that a number of antisocial traits, such as psychopathology, impulsivity, and negative affectivity, are also strongly correlated between mates. Although there is some research examining assortative mating in other disciplines, there is a paucity of criminological research directly examining this issue. We address this gap in the literature by analyzing a national sample of mothers and fathers drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort data. Our results are in line with previous research showing similarity between mates on antisocial behaviors. The ways in which assortative mating can be integrated into mainstream criminological theories are discussed.


Similar Titles:
Partner Similarity on Crime and Antisocial Behavior Across the Life-course: Assortative mating or Contagion?

Integrating Criminological Theory and Decision Research: Implications for Understanding and Addressing Crime in Marginalized Communities


 
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