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Minority Threat and Punishment: An Examination of Heterogeneity as a Predictor for Modalities of Punishment

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Abstract:

The minority threat hypothesis contends that growth in the size of a given minority population along with the ensuing competition for social and political resources will threaten existing social power arrangements (Ruddell, 2005). Regarding punishment specifically, the hypothesis states that dominant groups will support coercive measures to keep minority populations sufficiently oppressed (Ruddell, 2005). Using the minority threat hypothesis as our theoretical foundation, we posit that the more heterogeneous a population, the more social control will be necessary to maintain societal equilibrium for those in power. In effect a more personal, physical and visceral response to criminal behavior will be deemed necessary in countries with high levels of fractionalization. This more visceral form of social discipline will manifest as corporal punishment. Comparing modalities of punishment against varying population characteristics, we argue, that countries with higher levels of ethnic, linguistic, and religious fractionalization will be more likely to employ corporal punishment against criminal offenders.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371844_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Pate, Matthew. and Gould, Laurie. "Minority Threat and Punishment: An Examination of Heterogeneity as a Predictor for Modalities of Punishment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371844_index.html>

APA Citation:

Pate, M. and Gould, L. , 2009-11-04 "Minority Threat and Punishment: An Examination of Heterogeneity as a Predictor for Modalities of Punishment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371844_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The minority threat hypothesis contends that growth in the size of a given minority population along with the ensuing competition for social and political resources will threaten existing social power arrangements (Ruddell, 2005). Regarding punishment specifically, the hypothesis states that dominant groups will support coercive measures to keep minority populations sufficiently oppressed (Ruddell, 2005). Using the minority threat hypothesis as our theoretical foundation, we posit that the more heterogeneous a population, the more social control will be necessary to maintain societal equilibrium for those in power. In effect a more personal, physical and visceral response to criminal behavior will be deemed necessary in countries with high levels of fractionalization. This more visceral form of social discipline will manifest as corporal punishment. Comparing modalities of punishment against varying population characteristics, we argue, that countries with higher levels of ethnic, linguistic, and religious fractionalization will be more likely to employ corporal punishment against criminal offenders.


Similar Titles:
An Examination of Perceived Threat and Intergroup Contact as Predictors of Support for Political Violence in Northern Ireland and India

Group Threat and Punishment: Examining Ethnic Disparity in the Exercise of Social Control in Society


 
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