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Immigrant Households Protect Youth from Violence

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Abstract:

A long tradition of research has established that immigrants often settle into densely populated neighborhoods in U.S. cities that for environmental reasons are more prone violence and injury outcomes. While this perspective now dominates academic discourse on neighborhood effects, less attention has been placed in recent years on the role that immigrant succession itself has on violence and injury prevention. We posit that immigrant households may have greater incentives for protecting youth from negative life outcomes, including victimization, through increased social controls tied to incentives for economic advancement compared to similarly-situated non-immigrant families who have experienced years of economic and political exclusion. We analyzed two waves of household interviews with approximately 700 families living in divergent Los Angeles neighborhoods. We apply mulitlevel and propensity score modeling to estimate the immigrant effect on youth violence. Our results indicate that youth living in immigrant households are at significantly reduced odds for serious forms of youth violence compared to similarly situated youth living in non-immigrant households. Immigration appears to be linked to violence prevention among youth. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy discussions on immigration.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371947_index.html
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MLA Citation:

MacDonald, John. and Saunders, Jessica. "Immigrant Households Protect Youth from Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 03, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371947_index.html>

APA Citation:

MacDonald, J. M. and Saunders, J. , 2009-11-03 "Immigrant Households Protect Youth from Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371947_index.html

Publication Type: Paper "Policy Proposal"
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A long tradition of research has established that immigrants often settle into densely populated neighborhoods in U.S. cities that for environmental reasons are more prone violence and injury outcomes. While this perspective now dominates academic discourse on neighborhood effects, less attention has been placed in recent years on the role that immigrant succession itself has on violence and injury prevention. We posit that immigrant households may have greater incentives for protecting youth from negative life outcomes, including victimization, through increased social controls tied to incentives for economic advancement compared to similarly-situated non-immigrant families who have experienced years of economic and political exclusion. We analyzed two waves of household interviews with approximately 700 families living in divergent Los Angeles neighborhoods. We apply mulitlevel and propensity score modeling to estimate the immigrant effect on youth violence. Our results indicate that youth living in immigrant households are at significantly reduced odds for serious forms of youth violence compared to similarly situated youth living in non-immigrant households. Immigration appears to be linked to violence prevention among youth. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy discussions on immigration.


Similar Titles:
Innocence as Legal Fiction in the Settler Colonial Nation-State: Immigration Law, the War on Terror, and the Protection of Immigrant Women from Violence

Risk and Protective Factors for Violence for Inner-City Youth: Findings from the Chicago Youth Development Study

An exploration of social networks as relational assets for protecting youth from exposure to violence

Prosecution for Protection: A Call for a More Global Approach to Combating Youth Gang Violence in the United States


 
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