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Illustrating Race and Class Differences in Men’s Narratives of Intimate Partner Violence

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Abstract:

This research examines how race and class impact abusive men’s narratives about intimate partner violence. Consistent with previous research, the White men in my sample primarily explained their violence through scapegoating. These men excused their behavior by blaming the actions of women. Specifically, the men argued that the women “push” the men into violence by arguing and refusing to listen. In contrast, justifications were employed by Black men in my sample more often than excuses. Primarily, the black men in my study denied victim status by arguing that the women actually initiated the fight by chasing after them or initiated the fight by hitting them first. The men’s narratives about intimate partner violence also revealed important differences by class. Men from socially disadvantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have employed violence in various social relationships and with multiple women. These men were more likely to be currently living with their intimate partners and to have access to guns. In contrast, men from socially advantaged neighborhoods tended to only have a history of intimate partner violence. Many of these men described this relationship as the only time that they had been violent against women.
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Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372098_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mansley, Elizabeth. "Illustrating Race and Class Differences in Men’s Narratives of Intimate Partner Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372098_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mansley, E. A. , 2009-11-04 "Illustrating Race and Class Differences in Men’s Narratives of Intimate Partner Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372098_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research examines how race and class impact abusive men’s narratives about intimate partner violence. Consistent with previous research, the White men in my sample primarily explained their violence through scapegoating. These men excused their behavior by blaming the actions of women. Specifically, the men argued that the women “push” the men into violence by arguing and refusing to listen. In contrast, justifications were employed by Black men in my sample more often than excuses. Primarily, the black men in my study denied victim status by arguing that the women actually initiated the fight by chasing after them or initiated the fight by hitting them first. The men’s narratives about intimate partner violence also revealed important differences by class. Men from socially disadvantaged neighborhoods were more likely to have employed violence in various social relationships and with multiple women. These men were more likely to be currently living with their intimate partners and to have access to guns. In contrast, men from socially advantaged neighborhoods tended to only have a history of intimate partner violence. Many of these men described this relationship as the only time that they had been violent against women.


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The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Findings on Race, Ethnicity, and Class Differences in the Prevalence of IPV, Sexual Violence, and Stalking


 
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