Citation

Micro Places as Origins and Destinations of Crime

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Abstract:

Empirical research findings, both quantitative and qualitative in nature, demonstrate that most crime is concentrated in a limited number of very small spatial entities: ‘pockets of crime’ that are often not larger than a block or street corner. A similar finding applies to the residences of the offenders: they tend to be concentrated in a relatively small number of street blocks. However, these two ‘micro-places’ are not always the same. For example, many of the places where crime happens are typically characterized by the presence of crime attracting businesses like liquor stores, fast food restaurants, and check-cashing outlets, but many of the places where the offenders live are not. To understand the relation between where offenders live and where they offend, we need to analyze their spatial behavior and target choices. Thus far, empirical research on criminal mobility and location choice has been applied to large units, such as census tracts or neighborhoods. The present study assesses whether various models of criminal movement (spatial interaction models at the aggregate level and random utility maximization models at the individual level) can be successfully applied at much lower spatial scales. For that purpose, data on crime trips, including detailed information on both the origins and the destinations —the offenders’ homes and the crime locations respectively— in the Greater The Hague area in the Netherlands are analyzed with spatial interaction models and spatial discrete choice models.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372188_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Elffers, Henk., Bernasco, Wim. and Bruinsma, Gerben. "Micro Places as Origins and Destinations of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372188_index.html>

APA Citation:

Elffers, H. , Bernasco, W. and Bruinsma, G. "Micro Places as Origins and Destinations of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372188_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Empirical research findings, both quantitative and qualitative in nature, demonstrate that most crime is concentrated in a limited number of very small spatial entities: ‘pockets of crime’ that are often not larger than a block or street corner. A similar finding applies to the residences of the offenders: they tend to be concentrated in a relatively small number of street blocks. However, these two ‘micro-places’ are not always the same. For example, many of the places where crime happens are typically characterized by the presence of crime attracting businesses like liquor stores, fast food restaurants, and check-cashing outlets, but many of the places where the offenders live are not. To understand the relation between where offenders live and where they offend, we need to analyze their spatial behavior and target choices. Thus far, empirical research on criminal mobility and location choice has been applied to large units, such as census tracts or neighborhoods. The present study assesses whether various models of criminal movement (spatial interaction models at the aggregate level and random utility maximization models at the individual level) can be successfully applied at much lower spatial scales. For that purpose, data on crime trips, including detailed information on both the origins and the destinations —the offenders’ homes and the crime locations respectively— in the Greater The Hague area in the Netherlands are analyzed with spatial interaction models and spatial discrete choice models.


Similar Titles:
A Test of Opportunity Theory at the Micro-Place as an Explanation for Spatial Displacement of Crime and Diffusion of Crime Control Benefits from Place-Based Crime Reduction Interventions

Housing Foreclosures and Crime Increase: The Relationship between Housing Foreclosures and Crime Concentration at Micro-Places

What Matters in Predicting Crime? Analyzing Risk Factors Related to Crime at Micro Places Over Time


 
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