Citation

Inmate Self Harm: Does Context Matter?

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Abstract:

Deprivation theories suggest that the harsh conditions of prisons (i.e. crowding, lack of programs, etc.) can increase prison violence and inmate misbehavior. In the area of inmate self-injurious behavior (i.e. suicide attempts, self mutilation, etc.), the influence of prison conditions upon this type of behavior has been ignored. Rather, greater attention has been given to the personal or individual causes (micro-level) of why inmates inflict harm upon themselves during incarceration. Data from over 1,000 inmates from 30 prisons were gathered to examine the impact of both individual- and prison-level variables upon inmate self harm. Preliminary findings suggest that inmate self harm can be explained from a contextual perspective incorporating both inmate as well prison-level characteristics. Specifically older inmates were less likely to inflict harm upon themselves, while inmates who committed assault and served longer sentences were more likely to inflict harm upon themselves. At the macro-level, inmates in prisons with a greater number of educational and vocational programs were less likely to inflict harm upon themselves. Other key measures of deprivation proved to be insignificant predictors of inmate self harm. These findings suggest that the deprivation theory, especially when predicting inmate self harm, needs to be reexamined.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372256_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lahm, Karen. "Inmate Self Harm: Does Context Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372256_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lahm, K. , 2009-11-04 "Inmate Self Harm: Does Context Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372256_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Deprivation theories suggest that the harsh conditions of prisons (i.e. crowding, lack of programs, etc.) can increase prison violence and inmate misbehavior. In the area of inmate self-injurious behavior (i.e. suicide attempts, self mutilation, etc.), the influence of prison conditions upon this type of behavior has been ignored. Rather, greater attention has been given to the personal or individual causes (micro-level) of why inmates inflict harm upon themselves during incarceration. Data from over 1,000 inmates from 30 prisons were gathered to examine the impact of both individual- and prison-level variables upon inmate self harm. Preliminary findings suggest that inmate self harm can be explained from a contextual perspective incorporating both inmate as well prison-level characteristics. Specifically older inmates were less likely to inflict harm upon themselves, while inmates who committed assault and served longer sentences were more likely to inflict harm upon themselves. At the macro-level, inmates in prisons with a greater number of educational and vocational programs were less likely to inflict harm upon themselves. Other key measures of deprivation proved to be insignificant predictors of inmate self harm. These findings suggest that the deprivation theory, especially when predicting inmate self harm, needs to be reexamined.


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