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International News Coverage of Human Trafficking Arrests and Prosecutions: A Content Analytic Study
Unformatted Document Text:  During initial searches, articles pertaining solely to narcotics and drug raids, frequently concerning cocaine, were persistent in the results. In order to suppress the likelihood of articles relating only to drug trafficking, without connection to the trafficking of human beings, the search criteria were focused to eliminate articles specifically pertaining to drugs, narcotics and/or cocaine. Such focusing was completed using the advanced search engine capabilities of Google News. By eliminating as many articles pertaining solely to drug trafficking as possible, a smaller number of false-positives occurred in the search engine results. 6 After compiling and comparing the results generated by the search engine from 1990 to 2008 7 (See Table 1), the last complete year of results, 2007, was chosen as the focus year for the study because it yielded, on average, the largest number of articles per search engine terms (e.g. human trafficking arrest). Based on the number of results produced by the search engine in 2007 and the time constraints of the study, a decision was made to focus all searches on the first six months (January 1 st to June 30 th ) of 2007. This decision was a matter of expediency. During the initial stages of data collection, I had hoped the study would span the entire 2007 calendar year; as such, the data were compiled 6 Although attempts were made to eliminate the number of articles unrelated to human trafficking and human smuggling from the search engine results, articles dealing with the trafficking and smuggling of the following were tabulated in the timeline results provided by Google News: arms and weapons, weapons technology, diamonds, uranium, timber, wedding gowns, political propaganda, pharmaceuticals, human skeletons, other narcotics (hashish, ecstasy, marijuana, heroin, etc.), art, alcohol, stolen property, oil, child pornography and cultural artefacts. It is important to note that false-positive articles of this nature often appeared in each portions of the timeline relating to the 1990s. As well, these articles, although tabulated in the original search engine timeline, were not collected or utilized for any portion of this study. 7 Newspaper articles regarding human trafficking were rare prior to 1990, as evidenced in the beginnings of the study when the search for an appropriate search engine occurred. 27

Authors: Denton, Erin.
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During initial searches, articles pertaining solely to narcotics and drug 
raids, frequently concerning cocaine, were persistent in the results.  In order to 
suppress the likelihood of articles relating only to drug trafficking, without 
connection to the trafficking of human beings, the search criteria were focused to 
eliminate articles specifically pertaining to drugs, narcotics and/or cocaine.  Such 
focusing was completed using the advanced search engine capabilities of 
Google News.  By eliminating as many articles pertaining solely to drug 
trafficking as possible, a smaller number of false-positives occurred in the search 
engine results.
  After compiling and comparing the results generated by the 
search engine from 1990 to 2008
 (See Table 1), the last complete year of 
results, 2007, was chosen as the focus year for the study because it yielded, on 
average, the largest number of articles per search engine terms (e.g. human 
trafficking arrest).
Based on the number of results produced by the search engine in 2007 
and the time constraints of the study, a decision was made to focus all searches 
on the first six months (January 1
st
 to June 30
th
) of 2007.  This decision was a 
matter of expediency.  During the initial stages of data collection, I had hoped the 
study would span the entire 2007 calendar year; as such, the data were compiled 
6
   Although attempts were made to eliminate the number of articles unrelated to human 
trafficking and human smuggling from the search engine results, articles dealing with the 
trafficking and smuggling of the following were tabulated in the timeline results provided by 
Google News: arms and weapons, weapons technology, diamonds, uranium, timber, wedding 
gowns, political propaganda, pharmaceuticals, human skeletons, other narcotics (hashish, 
ecstasy, marijuana, heroin, etc.), art, alcohol, stolen property, oil, child pornography and 
cultural artefacts.  It is important to note that false-positive articles of this nature often appeared 
in each portions of the timeline relating to the 1990s.  As well, these articles, although tabulated 
in the original search engine timeline, were not collected or utilized for any portion of this study.
7
   Newspaper articles regarding human trafficking were rare prior to 1990, as evidenced in the 
beginnings of the study when the search for an appropriate search engine occurred.
27


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