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Intergenerational Transmission of Violence, Risk Factors and Gender Differences

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Abstract:

Crime runs in families: a convicted parent is a risk factor for children’s criminality. Research has shown that this is also true for violent behavior. Hardly any research, however, has been carried out on the question of whether this transmission is the same for boys and girls. An even more important question is how we can explain this transmission and possible differences between boys and girls. Can intergenerational transmission be explained by continuity of family risk factors, such as poor parental supervision, large family size and harsh discipline?
These questions are answered using the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal study of 411 boys born around 1953 in London. Not only the original boys are studied, but this time their brothers and sisters are included as well. In this way, we can study around 1400 siblings and their parents. The main statistical analyses used to answer these questions will involve calculating odds ratios.
Violence is a serious problem in our society and we want to reduce this behavior by designing effective interventions against it. To be able to do this, we need to know more about the mechanisms causing intergenerational transmission of violence. This study will help to fill this gap of knowledge.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372828_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Besemer, Sytske., Bijleveld, Catrien. and Farrington, David. "Intergenerational Transmission of Violence, Risk Factors and Gender Differences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372828_index.html>

APA Citation:

Besemer, S. , Bijleveld, C. and Farrington, D. P. "Intergenerational Transmission of Violence, Risk Factors and Gender Differences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372828_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Crime runs in families: a convicted parent is a risk factor for children’s criminality. Research has shown that this is also true for violent behavior. Hardly any research, however, has been carried out on the question of whether this transmission is the same for boys and girls. An even more important question is how we can explain this transmission and possible differences between boys and girls. Can intergenerational transmission be explained by continuity of family risk factors, such as poor parental supervision, large family size and harsh discipline?
These questions are answered using the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal study of 411 boys born around 1953 in London. Not only the original boys are studied, but this time their brothers and sisters are included as well. In this way, we can study around 1400 siblings and their parents. The main statistical analyses used to answer these questions will involve calculating odds ratios.
Violence is a serious problem in our society and we want to reduce this behavior by designing effective interventions against it. To be able to do this, we need to know more about the mechanisms causing intergenerational transmission of violence. This study will help to fill this gap of knowledge.


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Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration among College Students: Assessing the Risk Factors Using a Longitudinal, Gendered Approach


 
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