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Influences on Victim Reporting of Technology Crime: Results from the British Crime Survey

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Abstract:

A victim’s decision to report a crime is arguably one of the most important steps in the criminal justice process, but many victims do not inform authorities about an incident. While there has been considerable prior research examining factors involved in this decision-making process, it primarily focuses on the reporting of interpersonal crimes to law enforcement. Little attention has been paid to victim reporting of the fast-growing but non-violent phenomenon of computer or technology crime (illicit or abusive acts involving the use of computing or network technologies). This paper uses data from the 2003-2004 British Crime Survey to examine the influence of victim and incident characteristics within a rational choice framework as they relate to the reporting of technology crime to a number of different formal and informal sources. The author also considers the use of protective computer security measures as a reporting determinant, within the context of victim blaming.
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Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372871_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Berg, Sara. "Influences on Victim Reporting of Technology Crime: Results from the British Crime Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372871_index.html>

APA Citation:

Berg, S. E. , 2009-11-04 "Influences on Victim Reporting of Technology Crime: Results from the British Crime Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372871_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A victim’s decision to report a crime is arguably one of the most important steps in the criminal justice process, but many victims do not inform authorities about an incident. While there has been considerable prior research examining factors involved in this decision-making process, it primarily focuses on the reporting of interpersonal crimes to law enforcement. Little attention has been paid to victim reporting of the fast-growing but non-violent phenomenon of computer or technology crime (illicit or abusive acts involving the use of computing or network technologies). This paper uses data from the 2003-2004 British Crime Survey to examine the influence of victim and incident characteristics within a rational choice framework as they relate to the reporting of technology crime to a number of different formal and informal sources. The author also considers the use of protective computer security measures as a reporting determinant, within the context of victim blaming.


Similar Titles:
Fraud and Technology Crimes findings from the Crime and Justice Survey and British Crime Survey

Examining for Extreme Responders: Results from the 2009 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey

Witnessing and Reporting Violent Crime in the Caribbean: Results from the 2009 Jamaican National Crime Victimization Survey

(Re)Defining Sexual Victimization: An Analysis of Non-Classifying Incidents Reported to the National Crime Victimization Survey


 
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