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Making Sense of Broken Windows: The Relationship between Disorder and Crime-Direct or Indirect?

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Abstract:

“Broken Windows Policing” has become a central component of police strategies to combat crime and disorder, but surprisingly the strategy and the theoretical model behind it have received relatively little empirical research. Additionally, in recent years there has been an ongoing debate over whether the broken windows thesis (Wilson and Kelling, 1982) argues for a direct or indirect relationship between disorder and crime. Some have suggested the former and challenged the thesis by finding little support for a direct relationship between disorder and crime in their analyses (see Harcourt, 2001; Sampson and Raudenbush, 1999; Taylor, 2001). Others have claimed that the broken windows thesis has always suggested an indirect path where untended disorder increases fear and subsequently erodes informal social controls/collective efficacy which leaves communities vulnerable to criminal invasion (Bratton and Kelling, 2006; Gault and Silver, 2008; Xu et al., 2005). This study aims to improve our understanding of the theoretical propositions of the broken windows thesis and shed light on this direct or indirect debate. The research utilizes data collected from an experimental evaluation of Broken Windows Policing in three cities to test the relationships between disorder, fear of crime, collective efficacy and crime using structural equation modeling.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373190_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hinkle, Joshua. "Making Sense of Broken Windows: The Relationship between Disorder and Crime-Direct or Indirect?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373190_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hinkle, J. C. "Making Sense of Broken Windows: The Relationship between Disorder and Crime-Direct or Indirect?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373190_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: “Broken Windows Policing” has become a central component of police strategies to combat crime and disorder, but surprisingly the strategy and the theoretical model behind it have received relatively little empirical research. Additionally, in recent years there has been an ongoing debate over whether the broken windows thesis (Wilson and Kelling, 1982) argues for a direct or indirect relationship between disorder and crime. Some have suggested the former and challenged the thesis by finding little support for a direct relationship between disorder and crime in their analyses (see Harcourt, 2001; Sampson and Raudenbush, 1999; Taylor, 2001). Others have claimed that the broken windows thesis has always suggested an indirect path where untended disorder increases fear and subsequently erodes informal social controls/collective efficacy which leaves communities vulnerable to criminal invasion (Bratton and Kelling, 2006; Gault and Silver, 2008; Xu et al., 2005). This study aims to improve our understanding of the theoretical propositions of the broken windows thesis and shed light on this direct or indirect debate. The research utilizes data collected from an experimental evaluation of Broken Windows Policing in three cities to test the relationships between disorder, fear of crime, collective efficacy and crime using structural equation modeling.


Similar Titles:
The Effects of Broken Windows Policing on Crime, Disorder, Fear of Crime and Collective Efficacy

The Irony of Broken Windows: The Relationship Between Disorder, Focused Police Crackdowns and Fear of Crime

Broken Windows in Cyberspace: Exploring the Effects of "Digital Disorder" on Computer Crime Victimization and Fear of Online Crime


 
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