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Impact of Race, Class, and Neighborhood on Public Satisfaction with Efforts to Control Police Misconduct

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Abstract:

A growing body of survey research has consistently demonstrated race and class differences in perceptions of police misconduct. Partly as a result of dissatisfaction among minorities, municipalities in the U. S. have increasingly adopted new forms of police oversight, such as police review boards, police auditors, and police monitors. Unfortunately, very little attention has been devoted to examining the effect of race, class, and neighborhood context on public attitudes toward these new police accountability efforts. Using hierarchical linear modeling on a random sample of 20,400 residents in 75 neighborhoods, this paper explores how individual-level factors (e.g., race, class, gender, age, education, victimization, and contact with the police) and neighborhood-level factors (e.g., residential mobility, concentrated poverty, violent crime rate, and race composition) shape attitudes toward the city’s efforts to control police misconduct. The preliminary results indicate that while race and class are significant at the individual level, their effect disappears when neighborhood-level factors are introduced. The policy implications for police oversight are discussed.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373316_index.html
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MLA Citation:

De Angelis, Joseph. "Impact of Race, Class, and Neighborhood on Public Satisfaction with Efforts to Control Police Misconduct" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373316_index.html>

APA Citation:

De Angelis, J. , 2009-11-04 "Impact of Race, Class, and Neighborhood on Public Satisfaction with Efforts to Control Police Misconduct" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373316_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A growing body of survey research has consistently demonstrated race and class differences in perceptions of police misconduct. Partly as a result of dissatisfaction among minorities, municipalities in the U. S. have increasingly adopted new forms of police oversight, such as police review boards, police auditors, and police monitors. Unfortunately, very little attention has been devoted to examining the effect of race, class, and neighborhood context on public attitudes toward these new police accountability efforts. Using hierarchical linear modeling on a random sample of 20,400 residents in 75 neighborhoods, this paper explores how individual-level factors (e.g., race, class, gender, age, education, victimization, and contact with the police) and neighborhood-level factors (e.g., residential mobility, concentrated poverty, violent crime rate, and race composition) shape attitudes toward the city’s efforts to control police misconduct. The preliminary results indicate that while race and class are significant at the individual level, their effect disappears when neighborhood-level factors are introduced. The policy implications for police oversight are discussed.


Similar Titles:
Does Minority Dissatisfaction with Police Travel When Minorities Move: An Exploration of Neighborhood Context and Police Satisfaction by Race

Satisfaction with Police: Examining the Interaction between Race and Neighborhood Disadvantage

“We did it for the kids,” Housing Policies, Race, and Class: An Ethnographic Case Study of a Resident Council in a Public Housing Neighborhood

Police Deviance and Public Trust: Exploring the Predictors of Public Satisfaction with Police Accountability Initiatives


 
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