Citation

Maximum Sentence: The Collateral Consequences of Life in Prison for Prisoners and Their Families

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Abstract:

The contemporary phenomenon of mass incarceration has contributed to a resurgence of scholarly interest in the prison system. Researchers have primarily focused on four areas: 1) measuring the extent of the phenomenon 2) analyzing how the politics of race, class, and gender contribute to sentencing policies and criminal justice practices, 3) documenting the decline of the rehabilitative ideal within the prison system, and 4) examining the consequences of all of this for the reintegration of ex-offenders into the community. What remains overlooked are the significant numbers of prisoners who will never get out. These prisoners are serving “maximum sentences,” sentences that range from a minimum of 20 years to life.

The current project is an ethnographic study of men serving 20 years or more in a maximum-security prison just outside of Philadelphia, PA. The project examines the strategies that prisoners use to preserve their connection to their families and their neighborhoods, as well as the ways in which family and neighborhood struggle to preserve the men’s figurative presence in community life.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373423_index.html
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MLA Citation:

McCorkel, Jill. "Maximum Sentence: The Collateral Consequences of Life in Prison for Prisoners and Their Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373423_index.html>

APA Citation:

McCorkel, J. "Maximum Sentence: The Collateral Consequences of Life in Prison for Prisoners and Their Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373423_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The contemporary phenomenon of mass incarceration has contributed to a resurgence of scholarly interest in the prison system. Researchers have primarily focused on four areas: 1) measuring the extent of the phenomenon 2) analyzing how the politics of race, class, and gender contribute to sentencing policies and criminal justice practices, 3) documenting the decline of the rehabilitative ideal within the prison system, and 4) examining the consequences of all of this for the reintegration of ex-offenders into the community. What remains overlooked are the significant numbers of prisoners who will never get out. These prisoners are serving “maximum sentences,” sentences that range from a minimum of 20 years to life.

The current project is an ethnographic study of men serving 20 years or more in a maximum-security prison just outside of Philadelphia, PA. The project examines the strategies that prisoners use to preserve their connection to their families and their neighborhoods, as well as the ways in which family and neighborhood struggle to preserve the men’s figurative presence in community life.


Similar Titles:
Life, or Something Like It: Pains of Imprisonment Among Life-Sentence Prisoners

Consequences of Criminal Sentencing for Adult Social Bonds: Economic Attainment and Family Outcomes in a Finnish Cohort of Convicts

Life with the Possibility of Life: Mature Coping among Life-sentence Prisoners

Another Unintended Consequence of Determinate Sentencing: An Examination of Violence in Prisons

A Good (Family) Life in Polymedia? The Ambivalent Consequences of the Mediatization of Migration


 
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