Citation

Coding the Code of Blogging Infrastructure: The Case of RSS

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

As part of our contemporary set of media technologies blogs are often described as the spearhead of what will be the future of journalism (see for example Brown, 2006; Robinson, 2006) and as one major milestone to a less mass production/mass consumption oriented public sphere. While it is true that blogs give more human beings voice compared to the organized and regulated field of media production during the last decades, it is also true that they as well give other actors: search engines, aggregators, content scanners, backlink generators and other software based agency are undertaking the task of weaving the webs that make the blogosphere its spin.
All these new actors are speaking a dialect of code, that of content syndication, often just referred to as feeds. A closer look reveals that feed code - although in every case a part of the Extended Markup Language XML - actually is more like a whole family of sociolects: RSS 0.91, 1.0, 2.0, Atom. Those different markup languages are codes for writing code and like every standardized and generalized markup language readable and processable for humans and nonhumans alike. But the different dialects are a way to exclude possible actors again: RSS 1.0 is better understood by software that by human users, with RSS 2.0 it is just the opposite. Atom is the attempt to make parts of the code understandable for humans while at the same time developing a kind of secret language for machines.
In my proposed contribution for the session What is Code? What is Coding? Emerging STS approaches in studying computer code I use the case of RSS as an example to show that the difference between code and coding might be useful for abstract formal linguistic analysis, but is misleading for STS approaches, especially when used in an asymmetric way - here the abstract technical object code, there the social process of coding. Instead I will try some infrastructure inversion (Bowker & Star, 1999, 2000; Star, 1999) by sketching some elements of the genealogy of syndication technologies to show how the coding of code itself can be studied as process of setting up, using, re-using and changing a complex sociotechnical assemblage of formal standards, implemented validation and generator software, ideological statements and practical workarounds.

References
Bowker, G. C. & Star, S. L. (1999). Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences. MIT Press.
Bowker, G. C. & Star, S. L. (2000). Invisible Mediators of Action: Classification and the Ubiquity of Standards. Mind.
Brown, D. (2006). Joe Blog's turn. British Journalism Review, 17(1), 15-19.
Robinson, S. (2006). Journalism and the internet. New Media and Society, 8, 5.
Star, S. (1999). The Ethnography of Infrastructure. American Behavioral Scientist, 43(3), 377-391.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
URL:
http://www.4sonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374174_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Passoth, Jan-Hendrik. "Coding the Code of Blogging Infrastructure: The Case of RSS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374174_index.html>

APA Citation:

Passoth, J. "Coding the Code of Blogging Infrastructure: The Case of RSS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374174_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: As part of our contemporary set of media technologies blogs are often described as the spearhead of what will be the future of journalism (see for example Brown, 2006; Robinson, 2006) and as one major milestone to a less mass production/mass consumption oriented public sphere. While it is true that blogs give more human beings voice compared to the organized and regulated field of media production during the last decades, it is also true that they as well give other actors: search engines, aggregators, content scanners, backlink generators and other software based agency are undertaking the task of weaving the webs that make the blogosphere its spin.
All these new actors are speaking a dialect of code, that of content syndication, often just referred to as feeds. A closer look reveals that feed code - although in every case a part of the Extended Markup Language XML - actually is more like a whole family of sociolects: RSS 0.91, 1.0, 2.0, Atom. Those different markup languages are codes for writing code and like every standardized and generalized markup language readable and processable for humans and nonhumans alike. But the different dialects are a way to exclude possible actors again: RSS 1.0 is better understood by software that by human users, with RSS 2.0 it is just the opposite. Atom is the attempt to make parts of the code understandable for humans while at the same time developing a kind of secret language for machines.
In my proposed contribution for the session What is Code? What is Coding? Emerging STS approaches in studying computer code I use the case of RSS as an example to show that the difference between code and coding might be useful for abstract formal linguistic analysis, but is misleading for STS approaches, especially when used in an asymmetric way - here the abstract technical object code, there the social process of coding. Instead I will try some infrastructure inversion (Bowker & Star, 1999, 2000; Star, 1999) by sketching some elements of the genealogy of syndication technologies to show how the coding of code itself can be studied as process of setting up, using, re-using and changing a complex sociotechnical assemblage of formal standards, implemented validation and generator software, ideological statements and practical workarounds.

References
Bowker, G. C. & Star, S. L. (1999). Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences. MIT Press.
Bowker, G. C. & Star, S. L. (2000). Invisible Mediators of Action: Classification and the Ubiquity of Standards. Mind.
Brown, D. (2006). Joe Blog's turn. British Journalism Review, 17(1), 15-19.
Robinson, S. (2006). Journalism and the internet. New Media and Society, 8, 5.
Star, S. (1999). The Ethnography of Infrastructure. American Behavioral Scientist, 43(3), 377-391.


Similar Titles:
How Secure is Saudi Oil? An Analysis of a Worst-Case Attack on Saudi Oil Infrastructure

Road Infrastructure and African Americans in the Post-Civil Rights Period: A Case Study of Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Fighting Piracy One Agreement at a Time: The Case of YemenÂ’s Compliance with the Code of Conduct


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.