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Cross-cultural Regulation: An Analysis of Pesticide Regulation in Japan and the United States

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Abstract:

Pesticides have been a mainstay in industrial agriculture since the 1960s, yet the harmonization of pesticide regulation between developed nations has been the source of significant controversy over the past half century. As recently as 2006, Japan implemented a new regulatory policy for agricultural chemicals. Japan’s introduction of their own maximum residue limits (MRLs) adds to a growing list of countries, including the United States, Canada, the European Union, Australia, and New Zealand, that have their own specific MRLs. Through an analysis of two Japanese and two United States newspapers over a ten year period (1998-2008), this work examines how the Japanese and the United States’ media differ in their discussions of pesticide regulation. Specifically, our analysis focuses on the differences in scientific, economic and cultural discourses related to pesticides.

Our findings demonstrate that Japanese consumers play a much more active role in the conversation surrounding pesticide regulations, while the food industry and the government are much more involved in framing pesticide debates in the United States. In both countries, scientific expertise is called upon much more often to discuss issues focused specifically on pesticides, but expert testimony declines as the topic shifts to more general discussions related to food safety. The results of our research provide a comparative analysis of the intersection of ethics and science-based regulation within the global food system. Moreover, our work can provide a framework for considering the ways in which these two nations will most likely differ in their regulatory approaches to future agrifood technologies, such as nanotechnology.
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Association:
Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
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http://www.4sonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374333_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ransom, Elizabeth. and Yamaguchi, Tomiko. "Cross-cultural Regulation: An Analysis of Pesticide Regulation in Japan and the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA, Oct 28, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374333_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ransom, E. and Yamaguchi, T. , 2009-10-28 "Cross-cultural Regulation: An Analysis of Pesticide Regulation in Japan and the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Crystal City, VA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374333_index.html

Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pesticides have been a mainstay in industrial agriculture since the 1960s, yet the harmonization of pesticide regulation between developed nations has been the source of significant controversy over the past half century. As recently as 2006, Japan implemented a new regulatory policy for agricultural chemicals. Japan’s introduction of their own maximum residue limits (MRLs) adds to a growing list of countries, including the United States, Canada, the European Union, Australia, and New Zealand, that have their own specific MRLs. Through an analysis of two Japanese and two United States newspapers over a ten year period (1998-2008), this work examines how the Japanese and the United States’ media differ in their discussions of pesticide regulation. Specifically, our analysis focuses on the differences in scientific, economic and cultural discourses related to pesticides.

Our findings demonstrate that Japanese consumers play a much more active role in the conversation surrounding pesticide regulations, while the food industry and the government are much more involved in framing pesticide debates in the United States. In both countries, scientific expertise is called upon much more often to discuss issues focused specifically on pesticides, but expert testimony declines as the topic shifts to more general discussions related to food safety. The results of our research provide a comparative analysis of the intersection of ethics and science-based regulation within the global food system. Moreover, our work can provide a framework for considering the ways in which these two nations will most likely differ in their regulatory approaches to future agrifood technologies, such as nanotechnology.


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