All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Denying Destiny: Viewtron and the refusal to recognize mutual shaping of technology
Unformatted Document Text:  Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology consumers had to be convinced to try (Radolf, 1980). Advertisers were on board from the  beginning in a quasi­partnership with K­R, and Radolf (1980) also noted the interpersonal  communication capability; however “Viewtron will not allow users to send personal messages to  each other.” That was a choice Viewtron made. Instead, bulletin board postings were allowed:  “[Norman] Morrison said, ‘Like letters to the editor, people can enter frames for everyone else to  read. There will be editorial control. We’ll read the messages first and not let anything through  we consider libelous or obscene” (Radolf, 1980). Another article cited a poll of newspaper  executives investing in videotex and found that the greatest percentage, “34%, replied that they  wished to maintain their market” ("American Bell unveils videotex terminal," 1983). K­R Senior  Vice President Jim Batten (as James K. Batten) (1981) noted the two­way capabilities of the  communication as a means for consumers to make orders online. He fretted over the picture  quality and the general nature of the “unproven medium,” and at best noted the “enormous  diversity of information suppliers” that the medium could support, but the discussion was always  framed in terms of K­R offering and viewers/users receiving (Batten, 1981).  As growth failed to meet expectations, E & P noted changes in pricing ("Viewtron  growth has been slow," 1984) and the discrepancy between the expected number of users (5,000)  and the actual number of subscribers (2,800) ("Knight­Ridder cuts Viewtron staff," 1984). After  several years of testing and development, the success of the project came down to the period  between October 30, 1983 and early 1986.  The original offering fell 2,200 subscribers short, and  ultimately a broader national offering garnered only 20,000 subscribers and an overall loss of  19

Authors: Poepsel, Mark. and Ashley, Seth.
first   previous   Page 19 of 34   next   last



background image
Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology
consumers had to be convinced to try (Radolf, 1980). Advertisers were on board from the 
beginning in a quasi­partnership with K­R, and Radolf (1980) also noted the interpersonal 
communication capability; however “Viewtron will not allow users to send personal messages to 
each other.” That was a choice Viewtron made. Instead, bulletin board postings were allowed: 
“[Norman] Morrison said, ‘Like letters to the editor, people can enter frames for everyone else to 
read. There will be editorial control. We’ll read the messages first and not let anything through 
we consider libelous or obscene” (Radolf, 1980). Another article cited a poll of newspaper 
executives investing in videotex and found that the greatest percentage, “34%, replied that they 
wished to maintain their market” ("American Bell unveils videotex terminal," 1983). K­R Senior 
Vice President Jim Batten (as James K. Batten) (1981) noted the two­way capabilities of the 
communication as a means for consumers to make orders online. He fretted over the picture 
quality and the general nature of the “unproven medium,” and at best noted the “enormous 
diversity of information suppliers” that the medium could support, but the discussion was always 
framed in terms of K­R offering and viewers/users receiving (Batten, 1981). 
As growth failed to meet expectations, E & P noted changes in pricing ("Viewtron 
growth has been slow," 1984) and the discrepancy between the expected number of users (5,000) 
and the actual number of subscribers (2,800) ("Knight­Ridder cuts Viewtron staff," 1984). After 
several years of testing and development, the success of the project came down to the period 
between October 30, 1983 and early 1986.  The original offering fell 2,200 subscribers short, and 
ultimately a broader national offering garnered only 20,000 subscribers and an overall loss of 
19


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.