All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Denying Destiny: Viewtron and the refusal to recognize mutual shaping of technology
Unformatted Document Text:  Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology to threaten our basic newspaper business, they’re all the more inviting.” VCA planned to reduce  the subscription fee for the service, break its dependence on the expensive AT&T Sceptre  terminal, pursue business applications and target personal computer owners. Viewtron was met  with high awareness among potential consumers who were, however, unlikely to try the  expensive service. Ashe writes: “By switching our emphasis to personal computers, we hope to  overcome the cost hurdle, but we’ll limit our target market to those who’ve bought or will buy  computers. Fortunately, that’s a rapidly growing group.” Adapting the service to target personal computer users made a difference, according to a  June 17, 1985, memo titled “Recommendation on Viewtron.” Ashe projected a break­even point  for Viewtron within two years and rapidly growing profits after that point. At the time only  about 1 million U.S. homes were equipped with machines that could run Viewtron (Commodore  64, Apple II, IBM PC, Radio Shack). Thus, Ashe recommended keeping Viewtron going and  reviewing the decision in six months. He wrote: Why is this worth the price? If our assumptions prove valid and we proceed as proposed, we’ll have invested another $20 million before breaking even about two years hence. That’s a lot of money, and behind it lurks a great deal of uncertainty. Yet the potential benefits are inviting. We can reasonably expect, after paying that price, to hold a leading position in a competitive but fast­growing market. We’d be in a business marked by growing demand and declining costs…Ultimately, the $20 million investment must be judged in comparison with other ways to use the same money. If we spent it acquiring a newspaper, we wouldn’t get a very big one, nor would we get one with such open­ended potential. This is an infant business, filled with uncertainty, but headed toward steadily declining losses and the possibility of substantial—and fast­growing—profit. (Memo dated June 17, 1985) 26

Authors: Poepsel, Mark. and Ashley, Seth.
first   previous   Page 26 of 34   next   last



background image
Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology
to threaten our basic newspaper business, they’re all the more inviting.” VCA planned to reduce 
the subscription fee for the service, break its dependence on the expensive AT&T Sceptre 
terminal, pursue business applications and target personal computer owners. Viewtron was met 
with high awareness among potential consumers who were, however, unlikely to try the 
expensive service. Ashe writes: “By switching our emphasis to personal computers, we hope to 
overcome the cost hurdle, but we’ll limit our target market to those who’ve bought or will buy 
computers. Fortunately, that’s a rapidly growing group.”
Adapting the service to target personal computer users made a difference, according to a 
June 17, 1985, memo titled “Recommendation on Viewtron.” Ashe projected a break­even point 
for Viewtron within two years and rapidly growing profits after that point. At the time only 
about 1 million U.S. homes were equipped with machines that could run Viewtron (Commodore 
64, Apple II, IBM PC, Radio Shack). Thus, Ashe recommended keeping Viewtron going and 
reviewing the decision in six months. He wrote:
Why is this worth the price? If our assumptions prove valid and we proceed as 
proposed, we’ll have invested another $20 million before breaking even about 
two years hence. That’s a lot of money, and behind it lurks a great deal of 
uncertainty. Yet the potential benefits are inviting. We can reasonably expect, 
after paying that price, to hold a leading position in a competitive but fast­
growing market. We’d be in a business marked by growing demand and declining 
costs…Ultimately, the $20 million investment must be judged in comparison with 
other ways to use the same money. If we spent it acquiring a newspaper, we 
wouldn’t get a very big one, nor would we get one with such open­ended 
potential. This is an infant business, filled with uncertainty, but headed toward 
steadily declining losses and the possibility of substantial—and fast­growing—
profit. (Memo dated June 17, 1985)
26


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 26 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.