All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Denying Destiny: Viewtron and the refusal to recognize mutual shaping of technology
Unformatted Document Text:  Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology By the end of 1985, Viewtron had about 20,000 subscribers and dozens of major national  advertisers, but it still was not close to becoming profitable. VCA had been cutting staff for more  than a year. Yet a June 1985 memo featured a financial model predicting 30,000 subscribers in  1986 and 65,000 in 1987 (memo dated June 11, 1985). Ashe’s Viewtron Progress Report of Dec.  5, 1985, sets out new goals and maintains that “the results aren’t fully in yet, but early returns  look good.” But March 31, 1986, marked the official shutdown of Viewtron. After investing more  than $50 million, K­R decided to pull the plug. (AT&T is believed to have invested more than  $100 million in Viewtron before it had to pull out of the joint­venture to comply with its court­ ordered breakup.) On December 2, 1986, Reid Ashe, who had become the General Manager of  The Wichita Eagle­Beacon, spoke to an international association of media publishers in Nice,  France. The title of his talk was “Viewtron: Trying to Push Videotex in the U.S. Media  Competition. Why it Did Not Work.” Ashe began, however, by saying that Viewtron did work.  “After several phases of re­building and re­launching, it fulfilled its basic goal. It taught us  enough about the prospects for home videotext to make an informed decision to abandon the  field.” Ashe gave these reasons for abandoning Viewtron:  The things we can do especially well—news, advertising and graphics—seemed to offer us no advantage in videotext. Similarly, videotex seemed to pose no competitive threat to newspaper readership or advertising. Because unadorned person­to­person communication seems to be the driving force in videotex, we could foresee a business with low barriers to entry, many competitors and low margins of profit…We decided this is not an interesting field for Knight­Ridder today…Home videotex…has never done much for people that they can’t [do]  27

Authors: Poepsel, Mark. and Ashley, Seth.
first   previous   Page 27 of 34   next   last



background image
Viewtron and Mutual Shaping of Technology
By the end of 1985, Viewtron had about 20,000 subscribers and dozens of major national 
advertisers, but it still was not close to becoming profitable. VCA had been cutting staff for more 
than a year. Yet a June 1985 memo featured a financial model predicting 30,000 subscribers in 
1986 and 65,000 in 1987 (memo dated June 11, 1985). Ashe’s Viewtron Progress Report of Dec. 
5, 1985, sets out new goals and maintains that “the results aren’t fully in yet, but early returns 
look good.”
But March 31, 1986, marked the official shutdown of Viewtron. After investing more 
than $50 million, K­R decided to pull the plug. (AT&T is believed to have invested more than 
$100 million in Viewtron before it had to pull out of the joint­venture to comply with its court­
ordered breakup.) On December 2, 1986, Reid Ashe, who had become the General Manager of 
The Wichita Eagle­Beacon, spoke to an international association of media publishers in Nice, 
France. The title of his talk was “Viewtron: Trying to Push Videotex in the U.S. Media 
Competition. Why it Did Not Work.” Ashe began, however, by saying that Viewtron did work. 
“After several phases of re­building and re­launching, it fulfilled its basic goal. It taught us 
enough about the prospects for home videotext to make an informed decision to abandon the 
field.” Ashe gave these reasons for abandoning Viewtron: 
The things we can do especially well—news, advertising and graphics—seemed 
to offer us no advantage in videotext. Similarly, videotex seemed to pose no 
competitive threat to newspaper readership or advertising. Because unadorned 
person­to­person communication seems to be the driving force in videotex, we 
could foresee a business with low barriers to entry, many competitors and low 
margins of profit…We decided this is not an interesting field for Knight­Ridder 
today…Home videotex…has never done much for people that they can’t [do] 
27


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 27 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.