Citation

Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on the Shape of the Age-Crime Curve

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The relationship between age and violence (the age-crime curve described by Farrington) is a consistent finding in violence research. The prevalence of violence rapidly increases in early adolescence, peaks in early adulthood, decreases more slowly through the 30’s and then levels off. This paper examines the ways that neighborhood disadvantage mediates this relationship resulting in differences in the curve parameters between advantaged and disadvantaged neighborhoods. Curves in disadvantaged neighborhoods might be at a higher level as more individuals participate in violence or do so more frequently, and “flatter” as individuals sustain involvement in violence over a wider range of ages, beginning earlier or desisting later. We use data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS)—a 14-year longitudinal study of the development of delinquency in a sample of adolescent boys—to compare age-crime curves of individuals residing in neighborhoods of different disadvantage levels (based on disadvantage scores derived from decennial census measures). Using generalized linear mixed models, we estimate parameters for main effects of neighborhood and individual risk factors. Mediating neighborhood effects are estimated using interactions between neighborhood disadvantage with linear and quadratic age variables. Both enduring effects from disadvantage in early adolescence and dynamic effects of residential mobility are explored.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p376722_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Fabio, Anthony., Tu, Li-Chuan (Charlotte). and Cohen, Jacqueline. "Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on the Shape of the Age-Crime Curve" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p376722_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fabio, A. , Tu, L. and Cohen, J. , 2009-11-04 "Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on the Shape of the Age-Crime Curve" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p376722_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The relationship between age and violence (the age-crime curve described by Farrington) is a consistent finding in violence research. The prevalence of violence rapidly increases in early adolescence, peaks in early adulthood, decreases more slowly through the 30’s and then levels off. This paper examines the ways that neighborhood disadvantage mediates this relationship resulting in differences in the curve parameters between advantaged and disadvantaged neighborhoods. Curves in disadvantaged neighborhoods might be at a higher level as more individuals participate in violence or do so more frequently, and “flatter” as individuals sustain involvement in violence over a wider range of ages, beginning earlier or desisting later. We use data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS)—a 14-year longitudinal study of the development of delinquency in a sample of adolescent boys—to compare age-crime curves of individuals residing in neighborhoods of different disadvantage levels (based on disadvantage scores derived from decennial census measures). Using generalized linear mixed models, we estimate parameters for main effects of neighborhood and individual risk factors. Mediating neighborhood effects are estimated using interactions between neighborhood disadvantage with linear and quadratic age variables. Both enduring effects from disadvantage in early adolescence and dynamic effects of residential mobility are explored.


Similar Titles:
When the Elderly Turn to Crime: Revisiting the Age-crime Curve in an Aging Population

Hacking the Age-crime Curve: A Study in Life-course Cybercriminology

Neighborhood Negotiations: Disadvantaged Residents' Crime Prevention and Police Partnership Strategies and Perceptions in a Midwestern Community


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.