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Honky Leadership: White Administrators in a Black School

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Abstract:

This paper presents findings of a two-year mixed-method ethnography conducted in an urban high school in the Southeastern United States. The study drew from critical race theory (Ladson-Billings, 1995, 1999; Lopez, 2003) and white privilege theory (Fluehr-Lobban, 2006; Kochman, 1981) to frame an analysis of the leadership behavior of white administrators in this predominantly African American school. Data collection included 105 formal semi-structured interviews with 52 different teachers and administrators, each of which lasted between 45 minutes and two hours. The average length of interview was approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Data were also generated via 452 hours of observation. Technical documents such as the school’s School Improvement Plan, a regional accreditation report, discipline plans, meeting agendas, and memos were collected whenever available (Bogdan & Biklen, 1998). Quantitative measures include school climate data, student achievement data, and other data used in administrative procedures such as student discipline referrals, absentee rates, reports, and other various records.
Findings suggested that White administrators in the school were largely unaware of the ways their privilege influenced their leadership behavior, and that they seldom questioned their assumptions about race through reflection or dialogue. Further, these administrators were mainly content to categorize students by race and make decisions for entire groups of people based on scant empirical evidence. The title of this paper evokes Dalton Conley’s (2000) book Honky, which chronicles a White boy growing up in a Black Chicago neighborhood. Throughout the paper at hand, the author refers to passages in the Conley text to explain phenomena from an empirical research study.
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Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377033_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Brooks, Jeffrey. "Honky Leadership: White Administrators in a Black School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377033_index.html>

APA Citation:

Brooks, J. S. "Honky Leadership: White Administrators in a Black School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377033_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: This paper presents findings of a two-year mixed-method ethnography conducted in an urban high school in the Southeastern United States. The study drew from critical race theory (Ladson-Billings, 1995, 1999; Lopez, 2003) and white privilege theory (Fluehr-Lobban, 2006; Kochman, 1981) to frame an analysis of the leadership behavior of white administrators in this predominantly African American school. Data collection included 105 formal semi-structured interviews with 52 different teachers and administrators, each of which lasted between 45 minutes and two hours. The average length of interview was approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Data were also generated via 452 hours of observation. Technical documents such as the school’s School Improvement Plan, a regional accreditation report, discipline plans, meeting agendas, and memos were collected whenever available (Bogdan & Biklen, 1998). Quantitative measures include school climate data, student achievement data, and other data used in administrative procedures such as student discipline referrals, absentee rates, reports, and other various records.
Findings suggested that White administrators in the school were largely unaware of the ways their privilege influenced their leadership behavior, and that they seldom questioned their assumptions about race through reflection or dialogue. Further, these administrators were mainly content to categorize students by race and make decisions for entire groups of people based on scant empirical evidence. The title of this paper evokes Dalton Conley’s (2000) book Honky, which chronicles a White boy growing up in a Black Chicago neighborhood. Throughout the paper at hand, the author refers to passages in the Conley text to explain phenomena from an empirical research study.


Similar Titles:
Conceptualizing Effective School Leadership in Urban Environments—Black School Leaders CHAT

Transforming School-wide Literacy Instruction: Outcomes of a Literacy Leadership Academy for K-12 School Administrators

Black Leaders Changing Schools: A Qualitative Study of Black School Administrators' Perception of the School Counselors' Role.


 
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