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Faculty Trust in Middle School Students: What does a teacher’s trust mean for a student’s school experience?

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Abstract:

This paper will present a detailed literature review of the growing research findings that demonstrate the strong positive relationship between a teacher’s trust in their clients (students and parents) and their students’ academic performance (Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, & Hoy, 2001; Hoy, Tarter, & Hoy, 2006; Smith & Hoy, 2007).
Beyond the literature review, the paper will synthesize convergent findings from three recent studies by this author: (1) A quantitative study of 56 public middle schools, supporting previously cited findings that faculty trust in students explains a significant amount of variance in student math and reading achievement scores beyond school size, student poverty, and student race. Tschannen-Moran’s (2004) Faculty Trust scales provided the measure of faculty trust in clients (students and parents) and individual teacher perceptions were aggregated to the school level. The state standardized tests for math and reading provided school level achievement data for the eighth grade. (2) A qualitative case study (Yin, 2008) of a school in transition where the implementation of a new advisory program seemed related directly to the teachers’ growing willingness to trust their students. In this study, the primary data sources included interviews with the principal and eight teachers along with observation data. The data were coded using a priori codes and then analyzed for emergent themes. (3) Initial findings from a long-term study of dis-engaging middle school students’ perceptions of their schools that demonstrate their awareness and concern with the lack of faculty trust in students. Video-taped presentations of student designed and performed skits demonstrating their views of their school experience served as the primary data source. All four student groups independently designed and performed skits that reflected negative relationships between teachers and students; the teachers in the skit, played by students, repeatedly conveyed a lack of trust in students through their actions.
The paper will end with recommendations for attending to and improving trusting relationships between teachers and students, a critical aspect of keeping students engaged in school and facilitating student learning and achievement.
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Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377264_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Kensler, Lisa. "Faculty Trust in Middle School Students: What does a teacher’s trust mean for a student’s school experience?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377264_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kensler, L. A. "Faculty Trust in Middle School Students: What does a teacher’s trust mean for a student’s school experience?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377264_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: This paper will present a detailed literature review of the growing research findings that demonstrate the strong positive relationship between a teacher’s trust in their clients (students and parents) and their students’ academic performance (Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, & Hoy, 2001; Hoy, Tarter, & Hoy, 2006; Smith & Hoy, 2007).
Beyond the literature review, the paper will synthesize convergent findings from three recent studies by this author: (1) A quantitative study of 56 public middle schools, supporting previously cited findings that faculty trust in students explains a significant amount of variance in student math and reading achievement scores beyond school size, student poverty, and student race. Tschannen-Moran’s (2004) Faculty Trust scales provided the measure of faculty trust in clients (students and parents) and individual teacher perceptions were aggregated to the school level. The state standardized tests for math and reading provided school level achievement data for the eighth grade. (2) A qualitative case study (Yin, 2008) of a school in transition where the implementation of a new advisory program seemed related directly to the teachers’ growing willingness to trust their students. In this study, the primary data sources included interviews with the principal and eight teachers along with observation data. The data were coded using a priori codes and then analyzed for emergent themes. (3) Initial findings from a long-term study of dis-engaging middle school students’ perceptions of their schools that demonstrate their awareness and concern with the lack of faculty trust in students. Video-taped presentations of student designed and performed skits demonstrating their views of their school experience served as the primary data source. All four student groups independently designed and performed skits that reflected negative relationships between teachers and students; the teachers in the skit, played by students, repeatedly conveyed a lack of trust in students through their actions.
The paper will end with recommendations for attending to and improving trusting relationships between teachers and students, a critical aspect of keeping students engaged in school and facilitating student learning and achievement.


Similar Titles:
On the Meanings and Functions of Silence: Middle-class White Women Teachers’ Socialization of Students of Color in School

Middle School Student Teachers and Special Education Student Teachers Working Together

Collegial Leadership, Teacher Professionalism, Faculty Trust: Predicting Teacher Academic Optimism in Elementary Schools


 
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