Citation

"Between Race Riots: African American Encounters with the Everyday Policing of Blackness in the Jim Crow Urban North, 1900-1935"

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Abstract:

Recent post-World War II African American historiography has focused considerable attention on the central role of police violence in shaping black activist agendas in the urban North. Much of this work attempts to chart and complicate the standard narrative of the southern civil rights movement by highlighting the war-inspired origins of northern activism as a reaction to the empty promises of racial liberalism, white homeowners and workplace resistance, educational disparities, and widespread racial violence, including police brutality. Although police brutality is now starting to be written into the post-WWII migration narrative of the long civil rights movement, it remains a secondary concern, a section or a chapter in a longer history of other issues. It deserves full treatment in its own right.

In this paper, I argue that the origins of black critiques and resistance to police violence are tied to the Progressive-era and the first Great migration. Indeed the NAACP’s founding is crucial to understanding initial organizational responses to the threat of the nationalization of racial violence, including police terror. Using the Tenderloin (NYC) Riot of 1900 and the Harlem Riot of 1935 as bookends, I present NAACP archival evidence, complemented by press reports, of everyday police abuses of black citizens in New York and several other northern cities. The scale of corruption, misconduct, physical violence, underprotection, and oversurveillance attested to by black citizens on a nearly daily basis, in these early years, demonstrates how crucial the policing of blackness was to the intensification of northern racism and the growing necessity for civil activism as the post-WWII era emerged.
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Association:
Name: 94th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377286_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Muhammad, Khalil. ""Between Race Riots: African American Encounters with the Everyday Policing of Blackness in the Jim Crow Urban North, 1900-1935"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377286_index.html>

APA Citation:

Muhammad, K. G. ""Between Race Riots: African American Encounters with the Everyday Policing of Blackness in the Jim Crow Urban North, 1900-1935"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377286_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Recent post-World War II African American historiography has focused considerable attention on the central role of police violence in shaping black activist agendas in the urban North. Much of this work attempts to chart and complicate the standard narrative of the southern civil rights movement by highlighting the war-inspired origins of northern activism as a reaction to the empty promises of racial liberalism, white homeowners and workplace resistance, educational disparities, and widespread racial violence, including police brutality. Although police brutality is now starting to be written into the post-WWII migration narrative of the long civil rights movement, it remains a secondary concern, a section or a chapter in a longer history of other issues. It deserves full treatment in its own right.

In this paper, I argue that the origins of black critiques and resistance to police violence are tied to the Progressive-era and the first Great migration. Indeed the NAACP’s founding is crucial to understanding initial organizational responses to the threat of the nationalization of racial violence, including police terror. Using the Tenderloin (NYC) Riot of 1900 and the Harlem Riot of 1935 as bookends, I present NAACP archival evidence, complemented by press reports, of everyday police abuses of black citizens in New York and several other northern cities. The scale of corruption, misconduct, physical violence, underprotection, and oversurveillance attested to by black citizens on a nearly daily basis, in these early years, demonstrates how crucial the policing of blackness was to the intensification of northern racism and the growing necessity for civil activism as the post-WWII era emerged.


Similar Titles:
Black Like Who?: African and Haitian Immigrants and Urban American Conceptions of Race

"Black-on-Black" Policing: African-American Police and the Negotiation of Marginalized Identity in American Criminal Justice


 
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