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Citizenship, African Americans, Multiculturalism, and the Courts, 1815 - 1865: Missourians Confront Diversity during the Age of Slavery.

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Abstract:

Missouri’s free and enslaved men and women recognized the multicultural nature of St. Louis and as a result used the court system extensively to petition for citizenship and freedom for themselves and their children and as a result, they filed more than 300 freedom suits between 1815 and 1865. Astute African Americans used territorial and state statutes as the basis for their arguments. Moreover, African Americans in antebellum Missouri not only depended upon their ties to the black community, but also white citizens of the state to maintain their freedom and livelihood once freed from bondage. Civil cases filed in St. Louis courts and the efforts of black Missourians to obtain freedom licenses during this first half of the nineteenth century reflect the recognition by these citizens of the region’s diversity. This paper contends that that laws of Missouri prior to and post-statehood allowed for a multicultural society that at times overlooked race, gender, and at times class and enabled African Americans used these statutes to achieve and preserve their citizenship in a slave society. The cases filed by black Missourians prior to the end of the Civil War argued on such grounds as having resided in a free state or territory, Native American heritage, or one’s status as a pauper made them free. In addition, free black men and women convinced some white residents to vouch for their status as working free citizens of color in order to obtain freedom licenses.
Convention
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Association:
Name: 94th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377327_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Barber, Marlin. "Citizenship, African Americans, Multiculturalism, and the Courts, 1815 - 1865: Missourians Confront Diversity during the Age of Slavery." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377327_index.html>

APA Citation:

Barber, M. C. "Citizenship, African Americans, Multiculturalism, and the Courts, 1815 - 1865: Missourians Confront Diversity during the Age of Slavery." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377327_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Missouri’s free and enslaved men and women recognized the multicultural nature of St. Louis and as a result used the court system extensively to petition for citizenship and freedom for themselves and their children and as a result, they filed more than 300 freedom suits between 1815 and 1865. Astute African Americans used territorial and state statutes as the basis for their arguments. Moreover, African Americans in antebellum Missouri not only depended upon their ties to the black community, but also white citizens of the state to maintain their freedom and livelihood once freed from bondage. Civil cases filed in St. Louis courts and the efforts of black Missourians to obtain freedom licenses during this first half of the nineteenth century reflect the recognition by these citizens of the region’s diversity. This paper contends that that laws of Missouri prior to and post-statehood allowed for a multicultural society that at times overlooked race, gender, and at times class and enabled African Americans used these statutes to achieve and preserve their citizenship in a slave society. The cases filed by black Missourians prior to the end of the Civil War argued on such grounds as having resided in a free state or territory, Native American heritage, or one’s status as a pauper made them free. In addition, free black men and women convinced some white residents to vouch for their status as working free citizens of color in order to obtain freedom licenses.


Similar Titles:
African American Women’s Work: Educating African Americans from slavery to the 19th Century

Wandering Through the Wilderness: An African American Family's Journey from Slavery to Citizenship


 
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