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Educational Leaders Empowering Students to Become Global Citizens

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Abstract:

In the first decade of the 21st century, the US experienced adverse events that threatened the safety of its society. As a consequence, discussions about globalization and internationalization in schools were restricted to protecting borders and insulating this country from others. With a new governmental administration, possibilities of important discussions in international relations may again spark the interest of preparing students for a globalized world. In this paper, the author discusses the importance of continuing conversations of globalization and internationalization in schools in order to prepare students as informed citizens in society. Similarly, informed educators and educational leaders can better prepare students to become engaged citizens when sustaining empowering environments that include conversations about economic and sociopolitical discourses. By including sociopolitical issues that affect students and their families, educators and educational leaders bring awareness and meaning into academic goals and objectives. A critical sociopolitical framework guides the development of this paper. Theorists combining sociopolitical and social justice issues will be reviewed. Three areas can be used by educators and educational leaders as starters in order to increase their schools’ understanding of international contexts and the meaning of globalization: linguistics, curriculum, and leadership. The scholars in language and linguistics (Lakoff, 2004, 2006), culturally relevant curriculum (Apple, 2004; Sleeter, 1996; Giroux, 2005), and leadership for diversity and globalization (Banks, 2007; Bottery, 2004) critically analyze ways that prevent people from developing knowledge and skills necessary to become engaged, critical global citizens. Significant to the development of new generations in society is an understanding of world events under a critical lens. Schools are one of the few places in which students have the freedom to exercise sociopolitical ideas. In the discussions, the author links the aforementioned scholars’ knowledge of local and international contexts, and examines how they inform us about students’ possibilities and future realities.
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Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377987_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Murakami Ramalho, Elizabeth. "Educational Leaders Empowering Students to Become Global Citizens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377987_index.html>

APA Citation:

Murakami Ramalho, E. "Educational Leaders Empowering Students to Become Global Citizens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377987_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: In the first decade of the 21st century, the US experienced adverse events that threatened the safety of its society. As a consequence, discussions about globalization and internationalization in schools were restricted to protecting borders and insulating this country from others. With a new governmental administration, possibilities of important discussions in international relations may again spark the interest of preparing students for a globalized world. In this paper, the author discusses the importance of continuing conversations of globalization and internationalization in schools in order to prepare students as informed citizens in society. Similarly, informed educators and educational leaders can better prepare students to become engaged citizens when sustaining empowering environments that include conversations about economic and sociopolitical discourses. By including sociopolitical issues that affect students and their families, educators and educational leaders bring awareness and meaning into academic goals and objectives. A critical sociopolitical framework guides the development of this paper. Theorists combining sociopolitical and social justice issues will be reviewed. Three areas can be used by educators and educational leaders as starters in order to increase their schools’ understanding of international contexts and the meaning of globalization: linguistics, curriculum, and leadership. The scholars in language and linguistics (Lakoff, 2004, 2006), culturally relevant curriculum (Apple, 2004; Sleeter, 1996; Giroux, 2005), and leadership for diversity and globalization (Banks, 2007; Bottery, 2004) critically analyze ways that prevent people from developing knowledge and skills necessary to become engaged, critical global citizens. Significant to the development of new generations in society is an understanding of world events under a critical lens. Schools are one of the few places in which students have the freedom to exercise sociopolitical ideas. In the discussions, the author links the aforementioned scholars’ knowledge of local and international contexts, and examines how they inform us about students’ possibilities and future realities.


Similar Titles:
Educational Leaders’ Domain Knowledge of Reading: The Relationship Between Educational Leaders, Teachers, and Student Achievement

Entrepreneurship education to empower disadvantaged youth to become active citizens: A Community of Practice Approach

Disengagement to Success: What Educational Leaders Need to Prepare Students for the Global Economy.


 
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