Citation

“It’s not just going to collect dust on a shelf:” Faculty perceptions of the applied dissertation in the new CSU Ed.D. programs

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

All candidates in the new CSU Ed.D. programs are required to write a traditional five-chapter dissertation. It is to be based on original, “systematic, rigorous research” using standard research methods, yet it should “contribute to an improvement in public P-12 or community college professional practices or policy, generally or in the context of a particular educational institution” (CSU Office of the Chancellor, 2006, p. 6). This suggests potential for a hybrid model—both traditional and applied—that addresses problems faced by school leaders. How do faculty conceptualize the purpose, nature, and relevance of the Ed.D. dissertation for educational leaders? What personal, professional, and institutional factors have shaped their views and program policies? What are program expectations on dissertation subject, scope, and methodology?
This paper reports on a qualitative case study that explores these questions through semi-structured interviews, surveys, and document review at six of the first wave of CSU Ed.D. programs. The first-wave programs are significant not only in laying the groundwork for other campuses but in having had joint Ed.D. programs with Research 1 institutions before the independent programs began. The study’s conceptual framework combines policy implementation as the negotiation of cultural norms (Elmore, 2004; Kahne, 1996) with Wenger’s (1998) socio-cultural “community of practice” based on “joint enterprise” around “artifacts,” such as the dissertation.
The evidence from the analysis is mixed, with some programs stressing the rigor of the dissertation and others highlighting its relevance. For example, some cautioned that CSU would be under “intense political scrutiny” to prove that it could produce viable dissertations and thus lacked freedom to experiment. Others dismissed traditional dissertations as “collecting dust on a shelf” and contrasted this to their dissertations as being of immediate use to local institutions to “make a difference for kids.” At one campus, students design studies with large samples and generalizable results to ensure publication, while at another, they use their workplace as a “laboratory” for dissertations based in evaluations and action research. In approaching the dissertation, many participants agreed that “we are still feeling our way” and that greater faculty deliberation and dialogue are needed.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378240_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Auerbach, Susan. "“It’s not just going to collect dust on a shelf:” Faculty perceptions of the applied dissertation in the new CSU Ed.D. programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378240_index.html>

APA Citation:

Auerbach, S. "“It’s not just going to collect dust on a shelf:” Faculty perceptions of the applied dissertation in the new CSU Ed.D. programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378240_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: All candidates in the new CSU Ed.D. programs are required to write a traditional five-chapter dissertation. It is to be based on original, “systematic, rigorous research” using standard research methods, yet it should “contribute to an improvement in public P-12 or community college professional practices or policy, generally or in the context of a particular educational institution” (CSU Office of the Chancellor, 2006, p. 6). This suggests potential for a hybrid model—both traditional and applied—that addresses problems faced by school leaders. How do faculty conceptualize the purpose, nature, and relevance of the Ed.D. dissertation for educational leaders? What personal, professional, and institutional factors have shaped their views and program policies? What are program expectations on dissertation subject, scope, and methodology?
This paper reports on a qualitative case study that explores these questions through semi-structured interviews, surveys, and document review at six of the first wave of CSU Ed.D. programs. The first-wave programs are significant not only in laying the groundwork for other campuses but in having had joint Ed.D. programs with Research 1 institutions before the independent programs began. The study’s conceptual framework combines policy implementation as the negotiation of cultural norms (Elmore, 2004; Kahne, 1996) with Wenger’s (1998) socio-cultural “community of practice” based on “joint enterprise” around “artifacts,” such as the dissertation.
The evidence from the analysis is mixed, with some programs stressing the rigor of the dissertation and others highlighting its relevance. For example, some cautioned that CSU would be under “intense political scrutiny” to prove that it could produce viable dissertations and thus lacked freedom to experiment. Others dismissed traditional dissertations as “collecting dust on a shelf” and contrasted this to their dissertations as being of immediate use to local institutions to “make a difference for kids.” At one campus, students design studies with large samples and generalizable results to ensure publication, while at another, they use their workplace as a “laboratory” for dissertations based in evaluations and action research. In approaching the dissertation, many participants agreed that “we are still feeling our way” and that greater faculty deliberation and dialogue are needed.


Similar Titles:
Examining Student and Faculty Perceptions About University Courses and Clinical Experiences in an Elementary Teacher Education Program

Faculty and student perceptions of electronic communication in a distance and campus program

Faculty perceptions: Where do education administration programs stand with the ISLLC/ELCC standards?

Tools of the Trade: Ways to Apply Data Collected in a Study of Teacher Education Program Admittance Requirements and their Use as Predictors of Success among Traditional and Non-traditional Teacher Candidates


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.