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Moral Leadership in Schools: The Ecological Dimension

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Abstract:

Over the last several years, scholars have developed a “new narrative” (Furman, 2007) for educational leadership research and practice that focuses more on the moral purposes of leadership than on the scientific study of leadership per se. Among the moral purposes frequently mentioned in the literature are addressing social justice issues in schools, promoting equitable learning for all children, and engaging in the practices of democratic community. With the direction provided by this new narrative, many scholars are attempting to more clearly understand the nature of these moral obligations as well as the leadership practice that might effectively address them.
Related to this new narrative, this paper will make two main arguments: First, that one of the moral obligations of educational leaders is to help educators and students understand and address issues of sustainability and ecological degradation and how these issues are inextricably related to social justice issues in local communities. This moral obligation is conspicuously absent from most discussions of moral leadership and social justice in schools. Second, the paper argues that moral leadership in schools constitutes a praxis across five major dimensions or arenas of action—the personal, interpersonal, communal, systemic, and ecological—and that to address the moral purposes of leadership practice, leadership capacity across each of these dimensions must be developed. A framework representing these dimensions will be presented and explained, with particular focus on the ecological dimension.
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Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378311_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Furman, Gail. "Moral Leadership in Schools: The Ecological Dimension" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378311_index.html>

APA Citation:

Furman, G. "Moral Leadership in Schools: The Ecological Dimension" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378311_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Over the last several years, scholars have developed a “new narrative” (Furman, 2007) for educational leadership research and practice that focuses more on the moral purposes of leadership than on the scientific study of leadership per se. Among the moral purposes frequently mentioned in the literature are addressing social justice issues in schools, promoting equitable learning for all children, and engaging in the practices of democratic community. With the direction provided by this new narrative, many scholars are attempting to more clearly understand the nature of these moral obligations as well as the leadership practice that might effectively address them.
Related to this new narrative, this paper will make two main arguments: First, that one of the moral obligations of educational leaders is to help educators and students understand and address issues of sustainability and ecological degradation and how these issues are inextricably related to social justice issues in local communities. This moral obligation is conspicuously absent from most discussions of moral leadership and social justice in schools. Second, the paper argues that moral leadership in schools constitutes a praxis across five major dimensions or arenas of action—the personal, interpersonal, communal, systemic, and ecological—and that to address the moral purposes of leadership practice, leadership capacity across each of these dimensions must be developed. A framework representing these dimensions will be presented and explained, with particular focus on the ecological dimension.


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Litigation, Legislation, and Leadership: A Comparison of Two States with Different Political Ecologies Surrounding School Facilities

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