Citation

Knowing “How” Is More Than Knowing “That”: A Study of Educational Leadership Expertise

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper reports the results of a study to measure three primary domains of educational leadership expertise and to examine their relationships to one another. These domains are a) “problem-solving expertise” as developed by Leithwood and Steinbach (1995), b) Stein and Nelson’s (2003) “leadership content knowledge,” and c) “learning-centered leadership” as developed by Murphy et al. (2006), and Goldring et al. (2009). Data for the study were collected from all 52 principals and their teachers in an urban school district in the southeastern United States. Principals and teachers completed surveys that asked about the principals’ expertise and practices, and principals responded to six problem-based scenarios. The scenario responses were coded with rubrics that were developed using previous literature and feedback from content experts. Scores were assigned based on two considerations: 1) how many times a principal referred to a component of a domain of expertise, and 2) whether or not the principal developed the response in more detail suggesting a deeper understanding of the domain. Two researchers scored example principal responses to attain satisfactory inter-rater reliability (Kappa scores ranged from .63 to .71) before one researcher scored the responses.
The scenario scores first demonstrated that the scenarios tapped principals’ varying levels of expertise and highlighted qualitative differences in their expertise in different areas. Second, significant correlations between the three main areas of expertise revealed stronger and more complex relationships between these domains than what their definitions indicate. For example, while “problem-solving expertise” and “learning-centered leadership” differ greatly in their content, correlations between principals’ scores in these areas were statistically significant at .70. These results suggested that while we as a field have identified broader categories that help us distinguish between experts and non-experts in general, we are still uncertain of the specific content of these domains and how they relate to each other. Third, analyses of the scenario scores’ correlations with principal and teacher survey measures showed mixed yet promising results for their criterion validity: there were no significant correlations with the principal surveys, but the scenarios correlated more frequently with the teacher surveys. The results suggested that the scenarios and teacher surveys may be tapping similar constructs of expertise.
The final discussion first reviews the strengths and limitations of using scenarios to capture principals’ leadership expertise. It then discusses the conceptual and methodological implications of these findings for research on educational leadership expertise. Finally, it offers a number of future strategies to better measure the expertise that guides successful school leaders’ actions.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378357_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Huff, Jason. "Knowing “How” Is More Than Knowing “That”: A Study of Educational Leadership Expertise" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378357_index.html>

APA Citation:

Huff, J. T. "Knowing “How” Is More Than Knowing “That”: A Study of Educational Leadership Expertise" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378357_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: This paper reports the results of a study to measure three primary domains of educational leadership expertise and to examine their relationships to one another. These domains are a) “problem-solving expertise” as developed by Leithwood and Steinbach (1995), b) Stein and Nelson’s (2003) “leadership content knowledge,” and c) “learning-centered leadership” as developed by Murphy et al. (2006), and Goldring et al. (2009). Data for the study were collected from all 52 principals and their teachers in an urban school district in the southeastern United States. Principals and teachers completed surveys that asked about the principals’ expertise and practices, and principals responded to six problem-based scenarios. The scenario responses were coded with rubrics that were developed using previous literature and feedback from content experts. Scores were assigned based on two considerations: 1) how many times a principal referred to a component of a domain of expertise, and 2) whether or not the principal developed the response in more detail suggesting a deeper understanding of the domain. Two researchers scored example principal responses to attain satisfactory inter-rater reliability (Kappa scores ranged from .63 to .71) before one researcher scored the responses.
The scenario scores first demonstrated that the scenarios tapped principals’ varying levels of expertise and highlighted qualitative differences in their expertise in different areas. Second, significant correlations between the three main areas of expertise revealed stronger and more complex relationships between these domains than what their definitions indicate. For example, while “problem-solving expertise” and “learning-centered leadership” differ greatly in their content, correlations between principals’ scores in these areas were statistically significant at .70. These results suggested that while we as a field have identified broader categories that help us distinguish between experts and non-experts in general, we are still uncertain of the specific content of these domains and how they relate to each other. Third, analyses of the scenario scores’ correlations with principal and teacher survey measures showed mixed yet promising results for their criterion validity: there were no significant correlations with the principal surveys, but the scenarios correlated more frequently with the teacher surveys. The results suggested that the scenarios and teacher surveys may be tapping similar constructs of expertise.
The final discussion first reviews the strengths and limitations of using scenarios to capture principals’ leadership expertise. It then discusses the conceptual and methodological implications of these findings for research on educational leadership expertise. Finally, it offers a number of future strategies to better measure the expertise that guides successful school leaders’ actions.


Similar Titles:
Tete Chargee! Addressing Higher Education Challenges in Haiti: A Case Study Analysis of the Haitian Education and Leadership Program

Improving University/K-12 Educational Leadership Partnerships: What do we know since redesign?

LD1 Creating An Educational Technology Leadership Journal: A Continuing Case Study

Assessment of knowledge transfer from coursework to practice: An educational leadership preparation program case study


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.