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"Am I Not a Leader?": Exploring Identity and Representation of Black Women in Educational Leadership

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Abstract:

In her oft-quoted speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?” (1851), abolitionist Sojourner Truth challenged societal norms and systems that extended certain rights and privileges to White women, while devaluing and rendering invisible their Black counterparts. Historical accounts of her impromptu speech at the Women’s Convention in Akron, Ohio not only capture the content and power of her message, but also the impact of her physical presence as a Black woman who posed a challenge to systems and practices of racial and gender inequality (Stanton, Anthony, & Gage, 1889). This paper seeks to extend Sojourner Truth’s question and it’s most obvious answer, to the work of educational leaders and educational leadership faculty who identify as Black women. While the “great-man-theory” and similar conceptions of leadership have generally not included representations of Black women, this paper explores how the unique location of the Black woman, this intersectionality of race and gender (Crenshaw, 1990) that offers significant insight into leadership theory and how both the identity and representation of Black women in educational leadership can advance our understanding of leadership theory and practice in complex educational contexts.
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Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378468_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Horsford, Sonya. ""Am I Not a Leader?": Exploring Identity and Representation of Black Women in Educational Leadership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378468_index.html>

APA Citation:

Horsford, S. D. ""Am I Not a Leader?": Exploring Identity and Representation of Black Women in Educational Leadership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378468_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: In her oft-quoted speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?” (1851), abolitionist Sojourner Truth challenged societal norms and systems that extended certain rights and privileges to White women, while devaluing and rendering invisible their Black counterparts. Historical accounts of her impromptu speech at the Women’s Convention in Akron, Ohio not only capture the content and power of her message, but also the impact of her physical presence as a Black woman who posed a challenge to systems and practices of racial and gender inequality (Stanton, Anthony, & Gage, 1889). This paper seeks to extend Sojourner Truth’s question and it’s most obvious answer, to the work of educational leaders and educational leadership faculty who identify as Black women. While the “great-man-theory” and similar conceptions of leadership have generally not included representations of Black women, this paper explores how the unique location of the Black woman, this intersectionality of race and gender (Crenshaw, 1990) that offers significant insight into leadership theory and how both the identity and representation of Black women in educational leadership can advance our understanding of leadership theory and practice in complex educational contexts.


Similar Titles:
Generational Influence on Women Faculty in Educational Leadership Programs: Evolution of Self and the Impact on Future Leaders in Educational Administration

Women in academic leadership: Experiences of mid-level women leaders in higher education in the Mekong Delta

Cultivating Supportive, Professional Relationships Among Black Women in Educational Leadership: Shattering the Mirror of Self-destruction


 
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