Citation

Managed and Unmanaged Instructional Reform as an Environment for Leading Instructional Leadership Teams in Urban Schools

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In this presentation we contrast two urban school districts’ approaches to improving instructional practices, in order to explicate the range of ways school leaders work with, and seek to influence, other school staff who are exercising instructional leadership.

Taken from a larger study of leadership for learning improvement in four urban school districts, we draw upon case study data to highlight the dynamic responses of school leaders, in a set of six schools (three within each district), to the external conditions for instructional improvement and the internal context for learning-focused leadership work. These case studies exploit a clear contrast in settings: one district sought to manage the work of the school leaders by promoting a particular approach to curriculum and instructional change (including how instructional leadership should be pursued), with the assistance of an external, for-profit support provider. The other district left all major choices about instructional approach and approach to instructional leadership to the school leaders, and allowed them to seek out their own external support (e.g., from the central office or other sources).

In both these cases the school leaders were responding to the school district’s accountability system, press for data-driven practices, and the district’s expectations for instructional improvement while they simultaneously responded to the needs inside their school for professional accountability, data use, and assistance with teachers’ problems of instructional practice. The paper highlights where and how the district’s configuration of direction and support made a difference to school leaders and where it did not. Unlike some recent accounts of district impact on instructional improvement (e.g., Barnes, 2009), the coherence of the district’s instructional improvement thrust was not as salient at the school level as district-focused research presumes. Equally or more important were the school leaders’ own efforts at developing internally coherent and accountable approaches to instructional improvement. That said, the district’s approach to instructional improvement had a noticeable impact on the way the school’s instructional leadership cadre was configured and on the “scripts” school leaders used for doing their work, while at the same time leveraging the district’s interests to pursue the school’s own improvement agendas.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: UCEA Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.ucea.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378567_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Feldman, Sue., Yeh, Theresa. and Knapp, Michael. "Managed and Unmanaged Instructional Reform as an Environment for Leading Instructional Leadership Teams in Urban Schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378567_index.html>

APA Citation:

Feldman, S. , Yeh, T. L. and Knapp, M. S. "Managed and Unmanaged Instructional Reform as an Environment for Leading Instructional Leadership Teams in Urban Schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378567_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: In this presentation we contrast two urban school districts’ approaches to improving instructional practices, in order to explicate the range of ways school leaders work with, and seek to influence, other school staff who are exercising instructional leadership.

Taken from a larger study of leadership for learning improvement in four urban school districts, we draw upon case study data to highlight the dynamic responses of school leaders, in a set of six schools (three within each district), to the external conditions for instructional improvement and the internal context for learning-focused leadership work. These case studies exploit a clear contrast in settings: one district sought to manage the work of the school leaders by promoting a particular approach to curriculum and instructional change (including how instructional leadership should be pursued), with the assistance of an external, for-profit support provider. The other district left all major choices about instructional approach and approach to instructional leadership to the school leaders, and allowed them to seek out their own external support (e.g., from the central office or other sources).

In both these cases the school leaders were responding to the school district’s accountability system, press for data-driven practices, and the district’s expectations for instructional improvement while they simultaneously responded to the needs inside their school for professional accountability, data use, and assistance with teachers’ problems of instructional practice. The paper highlights where and how the district’s configuration of direction and support made a difference to school leaders and where it did not. Unlike some recent accounts of district impact on instructional improvement (e.g., Barnes, 2009), the coherence of the district’s instructional improvement thrust was not as salient at the school level as district-focused research presumes. Equally or more important were the school leaders’ own efforts at developing internally coherent and accountable approaches to instructional improvement. That said, the district’s approach to instructional improvement had a noticeable impact on the way the school’s instructional leadership cadre was configured and on the “scripts” school leaders used for doing their work, while at the same time leveraging the district’s interests to pursue the school’s own improvement agendas.


Similar Titles:
Building Instructional Leadership Teams: Embedded Professional Development in Urban High Schools Paul V. Bredeson University of Wisconsin-Madison

How Leadership Teams Members’ Roles and Responsibilities Influence Teachers’ Learning Environments and Perceptions of School Leadership and Initiatives

High Stakes Accountability and Centralized Instructional Management: District Control, School Leadership, and Instructional Quality

Conceptualizing Effective School Leadership in Urban Environments—Black School Leaders CHAT


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.