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Leadership and Parental Involvement: How Sudanese Immigrant Parents Participate in the Education and Upbringing of their Children in the U.S. Educational and Cultural System

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Abstract:

Most traditional urban education literature, when describing US school challenges, tend to pay special attention to issues affecting urban minority groups such as African Americans and Latinos (Rebell, 2005; Oliva and Marshall, 2006). Recent statistics show that urban schools in the US are increasingly receiving significant number of non traditional immigrants particularly from Africa. For example in 2005, refugees from Somalia constituted the largest group of refugees entering the United States (Nillson, 2008). Having been for decades one of the slowest growing populations in the US, the African immigrant population has significantly increased during this period accounting for a noticeable percentage of the non-White immigrant population in urban areas (Davis, 2008). The current situation poses enormous challenges for students and schools within an education system that typically creates generic educational policies designed to be applicable to all immigrants regardless of their background or situation. This tendency to view immigrants as homogeneous group has resulted in the masking of significant variations among large disparate groups of people. (Davis, 2008)
The importance of addressing this challenge is very pertinent in the US education system because “among the languages of the world, about 50 languages are spoken by at least 10,000 of the students in the US” (Preissle, 1998, p. 37). This is a clear indication that there is a significant growth of diversity in urban school population. This study presents new approaches to leadership practices by presenting the challenges that Sudanese immigrant parents in the U.S. face. In particular, it looks into how specific immigrant experiences can inform educational leadership and impact policy to ensure achievement of all minority children in the U.S. schools.
Keywords: Sudanese Immigrants, Leadership, Parental Participation
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Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378597_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Telli, Godfrey. "Leadership and Parental Involvement: How Sudanese Immigrant Parents Participate in the Education and Upbringing of their Children in the U.S. Educational and Cultural System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378597_index.html>

APA Citation:

Telli, G. "Leadership and Parental Involvement: How Sudanese Immigrant Parents Participate in the Education and Upbringing of their Children in the U.S. Educational and Cultural System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378597_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Most traditional urban education literature, when describing US school challenges, tend to pay special attention to issues affecting urban minority groups such as African Americans and Latinos (Rebell, 2005; Oliva and Marshall, 2006). Recent statistics show that urban schools in the US are increasingly receiving significant number of non traditional immigrants particularly from Africa. For example in 2005, refugees from Somalia constituted the largest group of refugees entering the United States (Nillson, 2008). Having been for decades one of the slowest growing populations in the US, the African immigrant population has significantly increased during this period accounting for a noticeable percentage of the non-White immigrant population in urban areas (Davis, 2008). The current situation poses enormous challenges for students and schools within an education system that typically creates generic educational policies designed to be applicable to all immigrants regardless of their background or situation. This tendency to view immigrants as homogeneous group has resulted in the masking of significant variations among large disparate groups of people. (Davis, 2008)
The importance of addressing this challenge is very pertinent in the US education system because “among the languages of the world, about 50 languages are spoken by at least 10,000 of the students in the US” (Preissle, 1998, p. 37). This is a clear indication that there is a significant growth of diversity in urban school population. This study presents new approaches to leadership practices by presenting the challenges that Sudanese immigrant parents in the U.S. face. In particular, it looks into how specific immigrant experiences can inform educational leadership and impact policy to ensure achievement of all minority children in the U.S. schools.
Keywords: Sudanese Immigrants, Leadership, Parental Participation


Similar Titles:
Parental involvement among transnational immigrant parents in the US: Japanese immigrant mothers’ perceptions of their children’s short-term schooling in Japan

Parental Support and Children’s Educational Expectations: Do Children of Actively Involved Parents Set Higher Educational Expectations?


 
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