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Students’ Experience in the Job Hunting Process and College Career Supports in Japan

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Abstract:

Scholars have pointed out that the U.S. does not have strong ties between schools and employers, compared with Germany and Japan. Although policies such as the Carl Perkins Act and the School-to-Work Opportunities Act have tried to make some linkages between them by applying programs such as, internship and youth apprenticeship. Moreover, the relationship between schools and employers in higher education level has not been well considered. This study, by looking at the experiences of Japanese students, provides insights into career development services that can serve as possible road maps for universities in U.S.
Studies (e.g. Brinton & Kariya, 1998) have shown that Japanese students use institutional ties in their job search efforts. According to Japan Educational Longitudinal Study [JELS], conducted in Ochanomizu University, Japan, high school students rely more on teachers to consult about future career than parents, friends, teachers in cram school, public job-placement office. As of 2006, 75.6% of students choose teachers as advisors, and 39.3% choose teachers as the most reliable advisors. Regarding postsecondary education, universities help students meet alumni, which can be called a semi-institutional network (Brinton & Kariya, 1998). Most colleges have career service centers, which provide internship, career guidance, relevant courses, and so on.
In this study, I explore Japanese students’ experience with school supports in job hunting processes, especially focusing on college career services. I interviewed Japanese students, who were enrolled in colleges in Japan, and were seeking jobs. Some of them had the experience of studying in the U.S. for a year. According to them, college career services in Japan are useful. However, these students felt that courses in Japan were not as useful for their future careers as courses in the U.S. were. College career services in Japan have improved through a period of economic depression, because the number of the unemployed youth increased regardless of their college degrees. These experiences illustrate possible strategies for leaders in career development services within the U.S. context.
Keywords: Career service, School-to-Work Transition, Japan
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Name: UCEA Annual Convention
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http://www.ucea.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378598_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nakajima, Yuri. "Students’ Experience in the Job Hunting Process and College Career Supports in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378598_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nakajima, Y. "Students’ Experience in the Job Hunting Process and College Career Supports in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378598_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Scholars have pointed out that the U.S. does not have strong ties between schools and employers, compared with Germany and Japan. Although policies such as the Carl Perkins Act and the School-to-Work Opportunities Act have tried to make some linkages between them by applying programs such as, internship and youth apprenticeship. Moreover, the relationship between schools and employers in higher education level has not been well considered. This study, by looking at the experiences of Japanese students, provides insights into career development services that can serve as possible road maps for universities in U.S.
Studies (e.g. Brinton & Kariya, 1998) have shown that Japanese students use institutional ties in their job search efforts. According to Japan Educational Longitudinal Study [JELS], conducted in Ochanomizu University, Japan, high school students rely more on teachers to consult about future career than parents, friends, teachers in cram school, public job-placement office. As of 2006, 75.6% of students choose teachers as advisors, and 39.3% choose teachers as the most reliable advisors. Regarding postsecondary education, universities help students meet alumni, which can be called a semi-institutional network (Brinton & Kariya, 1998). Most colleges have career service centers, which provide internship, career guidance, relevant courses, and so on.
In this study, I explore Japanese students’ experience with school supports in job hunting processes, especially focusing on college career services. I interviewed Japanese students, who were enrolled in colleges in Japan, and were seeking jobs. Some of them had the experience of studying in the U.S. for a year. According to them, college career services in Japan are useful. However, these students felt that courses in Japan were not as useful for their future careers as courses in the U.S. were. College career services in Japan have improved through a period of economic depression, because the number of the unemployed youth increased regardless of their college degrees. These experiences illustrate possible strategies for leaders in career development services within the U.S. context.
Keywords: Career service, School-to-Work Transition, Japan


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