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Historic Preservation Policy and The Economic Redevelopment of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Landmark District

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Abstract:

Cities across the United States are increasingly using historic preservation efforts to spur local economic development (Listokin et al. 1998; Newman 2001; Wonjo 1991). Historic preservation policy allows land developers, community organizations, and homeowners to take advantage of various economic incentives provided by the national and state governments. In many cities, the historic designation of inner-city neighborhoods has been associated with improving property values; the amount of available housing units; and the overall quality of communities (Coulson and Leichenko 2004; Rypkema 1994). In this paper, I examine how Blacks have been able to use historic preservation as a tool to revitalize their urban communities. The central research question is: What are the social, political, and economic outcomes associated with using historic preservation policy as a mechanism for redevelopment in urban Black neighborhoods? I use the Martin Luther King, Jr. Landmark District (Atlanta, GA) as a case study to explore how the designation of Black urban neighborhoods as local historic districts affects Blacks’ ability to both preserve and revitalize their communities. The MLK, Jr. neighborhood (commonly known as "Sweet Auburn") is the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and home to some of the city’s oldest Black churches and civic groups. Its designation as a local landmark district has led to the protection and restoration of important historical structures throughout the area. I hope this paper will reveal the significance and challenges of preserving neighborhoods that are historically important to Blacks and the implications this has for urban revitalization and community building.

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histor (185), district (122), preserv (116), black (86), econom (72), citi (70), local (69), neighborhood (61), nation (52), urban (52), develop (49), properti (46), use (45), build (42), communiti (41), state (39), design (36), redevelop (35), owen (32), owens-jon (31), jone (31),
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Name: Southern Political Science Association
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http://www.spsa.net


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396236_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Owens-Jones, Andrea. "Historic Preservation Policy and The Economic Redevelopment of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Landmark District" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Crowne Plaza Hotel Ravinia, Atlanta, Georgia, Jan 06, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396236_index.html>

APA Citation:

Owens-Jones, A. N. , 2010-01-06 "Historic Preservation Policy and The Economic Redevelopment of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Landmark District" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Crowne Plaza Hotel Ravinia, Atlanta, Georgia Online <PDF>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396236_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cities across the United States are increasingly using historic preservation efforts to spur local economic development (Listokin et al. 1998; Newman 2001; Wonjo 1991). Historic preservation policy allows land developers, community organizations, and homeowners to take advantage of various economic incentives provided by the national and state governments. In many cities, the historic designation of inner-city neighborhoods has been associated with improving property values; the amount of available housing units; and the overall quality of communities (Coulson and Leichenko 2004; Rypkema 1994). In this paper, I examine how Blacks have been able to use historic preservation as a tool to revitalize their urban communities. The central research question is: What are the social, political, and economic outcomes associated with using historic preservation policy as a mechanism for redevelopment in urban Black neighborhoods? I use the Martin Luther King, Jr. Landmark District (Atlanta, GA) as a case study to explore how the designation of Black urban neighborhoods as local historic districts affects Blacks’ ability to both preserve and revitalize their communities. The MLK, Jr. neighborhood (commonly known as "Sweet Auburn") is the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and home to some of the city’s oldest Black churches and civic groups. Its designation as a local landmark district has led to the protection and restoration of important historical structures throughout the area. I hope this paper will reveal the significance and challenges of preserving neighborhoods that are historically important to Blacks and the implications this has for urban revitalization and community building.


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