Citation

God, Gende, and the State: How Muslim Women Reinterpret and Reclaim Islam in the United Kingdom and United States of America

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Abstract:

This paper examines how the children of Muslim immigrants in the United Kingdom and United States negotiate their own political identities in the diaspora. I specifically focus on the escalation of female activists who want to reclaim what they interpret as Islam’s ‘original spirit’ on the subject of women’s rights, a position that was considered revolutionary for women’s status when Islam originated in the seventh century. It will be argued that these young activists are currently engaged in a project of clarification on two levels: first, they endeavor to correct public misconceptions external to their community—primarily promoted by media constructions of Islam—that judge their faith as fundamentally injurious to women’s rights; second, they attempt to amend cultural misrepresentations of Islam within their community, which they believe to be perpetuated by male, first generation leadership. Ultimately, this paper makes the case that second-generation Muslim activist women see the dislocation of diasporic experience as a positive force in their lives—one that allows them the space to negotiate a ‘true Islam.’

Most Common Document Word Stems:

educ (142), muslim (125), religi (86), citizenship (84), ident (76), multicultur (76), american (75), british (73), state (67), right (61), women (59), student (55), divers (53), communiti (52), cultur (50), polit (48), countri (46), islam (44), govern (39), britain (38), interpret (37),
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Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
URL:
http://www.ces.columbia.edu


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397806_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ajinkya, Julie. "God, Gende, and the State: How Muslim Women Reinterpret and Reclaim Islam in the United Kingdom and United States of America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, Apr 15, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397806_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ajinkya, J. , 2010-04-15 "God, Gende, and the State: How Muslim Women Reinterpret and Reclaim Islam in the United Kingdom and United States of America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada Online <PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397806_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines how the children of Muslim immigrants in the United Kingdom and United States negotiate their own political identities in the diaspora. I specifically focus on the escalation of female activists who want to reclaim what they interpret as Islam’s ‘original spirit’ on the subject of women’s rights, a position that was considered revolutionary for women’s status when Islam originated in the seventh century. It will be argued that these young activists are currently engaged in a project of clarification on two levels: first, they endeavor to correct public misconceptions external to their community—primarily promoted by media constructions of Islam—that judge their faith as fundamentally injurious to women’s rights; second, they attempt to amend cultural misrepresentations of Islam within their community, which they believe to be perpetuated by male, first generation leadership. Ultimately, this paper makes the case that second-generation Muslim activist women see the dislocation of diasporic experience as a positive force in their lives—one that allows them the space to negotiate a ‘true Islam.’


Similar Titles:
The Contentious Politics of Women’s Human Rights: Religious and Cultural Challenges to Women’s Equality in the International Arena.

Islam as Ethnicity, Islam as Religion: A Typology of how Religious and Ethnic Identities Intersect Among Second-Generation Muslim Americans


 
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