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“Should I just confess?”: The Perceived Consequences of Confessing and Confession Diagnosticity

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Abstract:

Previous research suggests that minimization and maximization techniques may be interpreted by a suspect as the equivalent of an offer of leniency and a threat of harsher punishment, respectively. The current study seeks to further this literature by distinguishing between minimization and maximization techniques that may or may not influence a suspect’s perceptions of the consequences associated with confessing. Results indicate that techniques that manipulate the perceived consequences of confessing decrease the diagnostic value of confession evidence. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society
URL:
http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398848_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Horgan, Allyson., Russano, Melissa., Meissner, Christian. and Evans, Jacqueline. "“Should I just confess?”: The Perceived Consequences of Confessing and Confession Diagnosticity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398848_index.html>

APA Citation:

Horgan, A. J., Russano, M. B., Meissner, C. A. and Evans, J. "“Should I just confess?”: The Perceived Consequences of Confessing and Confession Diagnosticity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398848_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Previous research suggests that minimization and maximization techniques may be interpreted by a suspect as the equivalent of an offer of leniency and a threat of harsher punishment, respectively. The current study seeks to further this literature by distinguishing between minimization and maximization techniques that may or may not influence a suspect’s perceptions of the consequences associated with confessing. Results indicate that techniques that manipulate the perceived consequences of confessing decrease the diagnostic value of confession evidence. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.


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