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Factors Promoting Truth-Telling in Children: The Effect of Expected Punishment and Appeal to Tell the Truth

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Abstract:

Little is known about the potential for interviewers to encourage honesty and decrease the likelihood of children’s false reports. The current study examined the effectiveness of internal or external motivation appeals and punishment on children’s truth-telling about a transgression. Results found significantly fewer children lied in both the internal and external appeal conditions when there was no threat of punishment for their transgression. The results suggest that truth induction techniques where positive consequences are emphasized are more likely to increase the likelihood children will tell the truth. The implications for professionals who interview children in forensic situations will be discussed.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society
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http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398889_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Talwar, Victoria. and Arruda, Cindy. "Factors Promoting Truth-Telling in Children: The Effect of Expected Punishment and Appeal to Tell the Truth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398889_index.html>

APA Citation:

Talwar, V. and Arruda, C. "Factors Promoting Truth-Telling in Children: The Effect of Expected Punishment and Appeal to Tell the Truth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398889_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Little is known about the potential for interviewers to encourage honesty and decrease the likelihood of children’s false reports. The current study examined the effectiveness of internal or external motivation appeals and punishment on children’s truth-telling about a transgression. Results found significantly fewer children lied in both the internal and external appeal conditions when there was no threat of punishment for their transgression. The results suggest that truth induction techniques where positive consequences are emphasized are more likely to increase the likelihood children will tell the truth. The implications for professionals who interview children in forensic situations will be discussed.


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