Citation

Age Trends and Suggestibility: The effects of Social Influence

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Abstract:

The present study explores how the source of suggestive information affects children’s memory for a witnessed event as a function of age. Children and adolescents ranging from 7 to 17 years of age watched a 10-minute video and were then interviewed twice about the witnessed event: once immediately after watching the video and again 1 week later. During the second interview the source of social influence (i.e. “A peer said…” vs. “An adult said…”) and suggestive information veracity (i.e. correct-leading vs. incorrect-leading) were manipulated. Possible age trends in suggestibility are explored, focusing on reverse developmental trends for peer-suggested information.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society
URL:
http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399022_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carol, Rolando. and Schreiber Compo, Nadja. "Age Trends and Suggestibility: The effects of Social Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399022_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carol, R. N. and Schreiber Compo, N. , 2010-03-18 "Age Trends and Suggestibility: The effects of Social Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399022_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study explores how the source of suggestive information affects children’s memory for a witnessed event as a function of age. Children and adolescents ranging from 7 to 17 years of age watched a 10-minute video and were then interviewed twice about the witnessed event: once immediately after watching the video and again 1 week later. During the second interview the source of social influence (i.e. “A peer said…” vs. “An adult said…”) and suggestive information veracity (i.e. correct-leading vs. incorrect-leading) were manipulated. Possible age trends in suggestibility are explored, focusing on reverse developmental trends for peer-suggested information.


Similar Titles:
Effects of Influence Agent’s Gender and Self-Confidence on Informational Social Influence:

Interrogation as a Social Dance: How Social Identity Influences Perceived Effectiveness of Interrogation Methods

The Effect of Disclosure of Third-Party Influence on an Opinion Leader’s Credibility and Influence in Two-Step Flow: Public Relations via Social Media


 
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