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Novices vs. Experts: Detecting deception in pre-interrogative interviews

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Abstract:

The current study seeks to expand the deception detection literature by using real-world pre-interrogative interviews to discern differences in how novices (civilians) versus experts (police officers) make decisions about deception. Videotapes of routine traffic stops depicting either liars (incriminating evidence was found in the car) or truth-tellers (no evidence was found in the car) were edited such that the final car search was cut out. Novices and experts watched the tapes and were asked to make truth/lie judgments about the target in each video. Students had 65% deception detection accuracy while police officers had 57% deception detection accuracy.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society
URL:
http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399025_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carlucci, Marianna., Schreiber Compo, Nadja. and Fountain, Erika. "Novices vs. Experts: Detecting deception in pre-interrogative interviews" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399025_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carlucci, M. E., Schreiber Compo, N. and Fountain, E. N. , 2010-03-18 "Novices vs. Experts: Detecting deception in pre-interrogative interviews" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399025_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study seeks to expand the deception detection literature by using real-world pre-interrogative interviews to discern differences in how novices (civilians) versus experts (police officers) make decisions about deception. Videotapes of routine traffic stops depicting either liars (incriminating evidence was found in the car) or truth-tellers (no evidence was found in the car) were edited such that the final car search was cut out. Novices and experts watched the tapes and were asked to make truth/lie judgments about the target in each video. Students had 65% deception detection accuracy while police officers had 57% deception detection accuracy.


Similar Titles:
Two heads are better than one: Effectively using two interviewers to detect deception during interviews

Enhancing Interviewing & Deception Detection Skills In Counter-Terrorism Efforts

Structured Interviews of Expert Military and Intelligence Interrogators: Training, Rapport & Lie Detection

Detecting deception: Can computers interview to detect persons of interest following an insider attack?


 
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