Citation

Bounded Solidarity: The Political Foundations of Basic Pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper investigates the political origins of universal, tax-financed flat-rate pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands. Sweden is often considered to be a social insurance pioneer with its 1913 reform, whereas the Netherlands was a late-comer, introducing universal flate-rate pensions only in 1957. Despite the focus in the comparative welfare state literature on the importance of universalism and tax-financing as defining features of the Nordic (and to some extent the Dutch) welfare state, we don't know as much as we should about the origins of these two crucial aspects of basic pension design. This paper attempts to fill this gap by investigating how both benefit entitlement and benefit financing were negotiated, defined an implemented in Sweden and the Netherlands.

Several things emerge from this comparative account. First, basic pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands were not universal from their inception, and only the Swedish pension was ever truly universal (from the 1950s to the 1980s). In Sweden, "undeserving" groups like alcoholics were excluded until 1948, and in the 1980s, entitlement became dependent on 40 years of residence. In the Netherlands, married women were excluded from individual pension entitlement until 1985, and uninterrupted residence has always been required for a full pension. Second, the insurance principle played a crucial role in both countries' basic pension schemes. The Swedish scheme started as a pension insurance and only lost its essential insurance-like traits in the 1940s. The Dutch basic pension is still considered to be an insurance. Finally, in their original form, neither the Swedish nor the Dutch basic pension was generous enough to prevent poverty in old age.

In other words, the key features of universalism and tax-financing are not nearly as self-evident and straightforward as the literature based on Esping-Andersen (and others) implies. Universalism has always been a more or less contested concept in Sweden and the Netherlands, as has the issue of tax-financing and contributions. Thus the solidarity represented by the basic pension in both countries has always been a bounded solidarity, subject to continuous political renegotiation.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
URL:
http://www.ces.columbia.edu


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400253_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Anderson, Karen. "Bounded Solidarity: The Political Foundations of Basic Pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400253_index.html>

APA Citation:

Anderson, K. "Bounded Solidarity: The Political Foundations of Basic Pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400253_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper investigates the political origins of universal, tax-financed flat-rate pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands. Sweden is often considered to be a social insurance pioneer with its 1913 reform, whereas the Netherlands was a late-comer, introducing universal flate-rate pensions only in 1957. Despite the focus in the comparative welfare state literature on the importance of universalism and tax-financing as defining features of the Nordic (and to some extent the Dutch) welfare state, we don't know as much as we should about the origins of these two crucial aspects of basic pension design. This paper attempts to fill this gap by investigating how both benefit entitlement and benefit financing were negotiated, defined an implemented in Sweden and the Netherlands.

Several things emerge from this comparative account. First, basic pensions in Sweden and the Netherlands were not universal from their inception, and only the Swedish pension was ever truly universal (from the 1950s to the 1980s). In Sweden, "undeserving" groups like alcoholics were excluded until 1948, and in the 1980s, entitlement became dependent on 40 years of residence. In the Netherlands, married women were excluded from individual pension entitlement until 1985, and uninterrupted residence has always been required for a full pension. Second, the insurance principle played a crucial role in both countries' basic pension schemes. The Swedish scheme started as a pension insurance and only lost its essential insurance-like traits in the 1940s. The Dutch basic pension is still considered to be an insurance. Finally, in their original form, neither the Swedish nor the Dutch basic pension was generous enough to prevent poverty in old age.

In other words, the key features of universalism and tax-financing are not nearly as self-evident and straightforward as the literature based on Esping-Andersen (and others) implies. Universalism has always been a more or less contested concept in Sweden and the Netherlands, as has the issue of tax-financing and contributions. Thus the solidarity represented by the basic pension in both countries has always been a bounded solidarity, subject to continuous political renegotiation.


Similar Titles:
The Politics of Inequality for Atypical Workers in Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and Denmark

The Politics of Inequality for Atypical Workers in Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark

Financial Crisis and Occupational Pension Regulation: The Politics of Restructuring in Switzerland, the Netherlands and Denmark


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.