Citation

Ignorance That Kills: Motherhood, Medicine, and the Francoist State, 1939-1970

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Abstract:

Francisco Franco’s dictatorship in Spain (1939-1975) is often marked by severe political, social and cultural repression. Yet it was also a time of intense state-controlled social reform. One of the Francoist state’s main projects was developing sophisticated and scientific children’s health care reform programs. State physicians, puericulturalists, and nurses were charged with developing programs to reduce infant mortality and strengthen the health of future generations of Spaniards. For these medical experts, one of the greatest challenges they faced in developing children’s healthcare programs was to encourage mothers to make use of state services. In order to gain the attention of Spanish mothers, state medical employees blamed bad parenting for high infant mortality rates and stressed state medical intervention as the antidote to childhood death. Through pamphlets, propaganda, parenting manuals, maternity centers and home visits, medical personnel endeavored to impress upon mothers the importance of science and professional medicine in the lives of their children. State employees defined good mothers as those who made use of state services and sought assistance from state medical personnel for scientific parenting advice. Through these measures, state medical employees attempted to usurp the role of the parents by making themselves the authority on child-raising.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

state (11), medic (6), parent (4), mother (4), employe (3), develop (3), program (3), children (3), mortal (2), infant (2), personnel (2), francoist (2), reform (2), social (2), servic (2), medicin (2), scientif (2), health (2), use (2), make (2), one (2),
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Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
URL:
http://www.ces.columbia.edu


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400475_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Salazar, Allison. "Ignorance That Kills: Motherhood, Medicine, and the Francoist State, 1939-1970" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, Apr 15, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400475_index.html>

APA Citation:

Salazar, A. E. , 2010-04-15 "Ignorance That Kills: Motherhood, Medicine, and the Francoist State, 1939-1970" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada Online <PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400475_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Francisco Franco’s dictatorship in Spain (1939-1975) is often marked by severe political, social and cultural repression. Yet it was also a time of intense state-controlled social reform. One of the Francoist state’s main projects was developing sophisticated and scientific children’s health care reform programs. State physicians, puericulturalists, and nurses were charged with developing programs to reduce infant mortality and strengthen the health of future generations of Spaniards. For these medical experts, one of the greatest challenges they faced in developing children’s healthcare programs was to encourage mothers to make use of state services. In order to gain the attention of Spanish mothers, state medical employees blamed bad parenting for high infant mortality rates and stressed state medical intervention as the antidote to childhood death. Through pamphlets, propaganda, parenting manuals, maternity centers and home visits, medical personnel endeavored to impress upon mothers the importance of science and professional medicine in the lives of their children. State employees defined good mothers as those who made use of state services and sought assistance from state medical personnel for scientific parenting advice. Through these measures, state medical employees attempted to usurp the role of the parents by making themselves the authority on child-raising.


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