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School Choice in Senior High School in People’s Republic of China

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Abstract:

Since 1952, the Chinese government has spent more resources on “key schools” which base enrollment on high achievement. The result is that pupils in different schools are subject to an unequal distribution of resources. In China, motivated parents search for high-quality educational resources for their children. Some parents have a great ability to send their children to “key schools” by using their private resources such as social power, economic advantages, and private relationships. The compulsory education law issued by the government prohibits school choice in primary and junior high school education and allows for school choice in senior high school. Based on the “three-restriction” policies in China (restricting the minimum acceptance score, the student number, and the school choice fee), each province has their own senior high school choice fee standards. Using data on Chinese school choice, the purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: What is the Chinese approach to school choice? What are the factors affecting senior high school choice fees in China? This empirical study finds that the ratio of senior high school choice fees to per student budgeted expenditure has a negative relationship with financial strength of local government and student number in private schools and school enrollment rate. The ratio has a positive relationship with GDP and student number and a significant positive relationship with the migration ratio of population. This paper will discuss how the lessons from Chinese school choice policies may help to policymakers regarding education equity and choice.
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Association:
Name: 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401114_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Zhang, Hui. "School Choice in Senior High School in People’s Republic of China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401114_index.html>

APA Citation:

Zhang, H. "School Choice in Senior High School in People’s Republic of China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401114_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since 1952, the Chinese government has spent more resources on “key schools” which base enrollment on high achievement. The result is that pupils in different schools are subject to an unequal distribution of resources. In China, motivated parents search for high-quality educational resources for their children. Some parents have a great ability to send their children to “key schools” by using their private resources such as social power, economic advantages, and private relationships. The compulsory education law issued by the government prohibits school choice in primary and junior high school education and allows for school choice in senior high school. Based on the “three-restriction” policies in China (restricting the minimum acceptance score, the student number, and the school choice fee), each province has their own senior high school choice fee standards. Using data on Chinese school choice, the purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: What is the Chinese approach to school choice? What are the factors affecting senior high school choice fees in China? This empirical study finds that the ratio of senior high school choice fees to per student budgeted expenditure has a negative relationship with financial strength of local government and student number in private schools and school enrollment rate. The ratio has a positive relationship with GDP and student number and a significant positive relationship with the migration ratio of population. This paper will discuss how the lessons from Chinese school choice policies may help to policymakers regarding education equity and choice.


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Teaching to the test: Teaching approaches in Senior High Schools in the context of the New Curriculum Reforms in China


 
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